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Found 221 results

  1. https://youtu.be/C6nqMXCFOoo
  2. The Zug bug is a fly that works really well, however it doesn't seem to resemble any particular bug specifically. Not sure really what it is supposed to mimmic. Some say caddis (cased or pupa), and while that could be, it really isn't a good representation. However, that means nothing in fishing. Something doesn't have to look identical to a forage for a fish to eat it. And trout love this fly. I find especially in the winter time for some reason. Although I have had them take this fly year round. The fly is also relatively easy to tie compared to some other flashy patterns like copper johns or prince nymphs (both of which also don't mimic anything specific, but trout love them!). As always I am listing all the materials used on this fly below. Hook: Firehole Sticks #609 in size 14 Thread: Veevus 6/0 in Black Tail: Peacock Swords Ribbing: Silver Tinsel Body: Peacock Hurl Hackle: Hen neck or saddle Wing Case: Natural Mallard Flank Head Cement: Original Hard as Hull
  3. This fly was originally created by Lance Egan, and is one of the best attractor patterns Ive ever fished. It's flashy, bright, and effective. I love fishing this as my lead fly, then drop to something a bit more realistic behind it. My favorite flies to drop behind this are the RS2, Pheasant tail, or black beauty. All of which can mimic midge or Baetis pupa and emergers quite well. So this fly can also be tied with a glass bead, and I believe originally it was created this way. However I like using brass beads here because it gives the fly a bit more weight, and I really like using this as my lead fly, to help other flies sink better. The flashiness of this fly really helps attract trout up to it, but many times I find they will strike the tailing fly instead of the rainbow warrior. This does not mean its not effective, just the opposite. It is very effective to get the fish moving out of their hole, to come take a look, but they elect to strike the less visible, and more realistic fly trailing it once they are close. As always I am listing all the materials used on this fly. Hook: Firehole sticks #317 in size 18 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in Red Tail: Natural Pheasant Tail Fibers Abdomen/wing case: Large sized Pearl Tinsel Dubbing: Tan Laser Dubbing Head Cement: Hard as Hull Original
  4. I just started fly tying last month and started with the suggested patterns, one being the woolly bugger. I fished some that I tied a few weeks ago at my favorite kettle pond. Every dozen or so casts I'll pull the fly in to check it and noticed that my leader was twisted. I've never have this problem before and thought it was strange. So this past weekend I went out again but put on a new leader with the same woolly bugger. Son of a... the leader was twisting again. So this BH woolly bugger must be doing some serious barrel rolling the entire time I'm stripping it in. Can't imagine a trout is going to go for a baitfish doing that haha. Anyone experience or heard of a similar issue? Is it the way I've tied the fly? I can't imagine my cast would cause this twist. I followed Tim Flaggers BH woolly bugger recipe on YouTube. I don't know much about fly tying yet, so I can really troubleshoot what I've done wrong. If it's nice next weekend I'll have to drag it through the water at my feet to see if I can see anything obvious. Any help would be appreciate. Thanks!
  5. A few months ago I tied up a fly called the Brahma Bugger, which I did not invent but loved fishing and tying the fly very much! The fly was originally tied by the tightlines youtube channel, and I re-named the fly "soft hackle bugger" because I did not use a brahma pelt, but instead used a soft hackle pelt from whiting. That video did really well, and that fly has been an amazing fish catcher for me. So I set out to improve on the fly, and make it better for a wider range of fish species. I wanted to articulate the fly, and give it even more movement in the water. So I present you with the articulated brahma bugger, which catches more fish than I could imagine. In fact, it far out fished any other fly I had with me on my last trip. I could not keep the fish off of it. And it seemed to attract some really large trout as well! This articulated fly is really my favorite streamer now, and I don't think I will be fishing anywhere without at least a few in my box. As always I am listing all the materials I used on this fly. Hook: Firehole sticks #811 in size 6 Shank: Small sized Fish Joint Thread: Veevus 6/0 in Olive Feathers: Whiting Coq de Leon soft hackle with chickabou pelt died Chartreuse Wire: Small Intruder wire in black Cement: Brush on Zap a Gap Head cement: Solarez "Bone Dry" UV resin
  6. The Royal Wulff is a great fly, except its really difficult to tie in those calf tail wings. But I have come up with an easier way, that I think actually is better. It makes the fly float higher, easier to see, and is much easier to tie in. In small mountain creeks and streams, there is one fly that seems to out preform all the others. Of course thats this fly, the Royal Wulff. There isn't a time that this fly isn't in my box with hiking in the back country. Great little flies. I am not sure really what the trout mistake it as, some say a flying ant. But no matter what the trout think it is, it works, and that is all that matters! Hook: Firehole Sticks #419 in size 16 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in black Tail: Moose Body Hair Abdomen: Peacock Hurl Hot Spot: Uni Floss Wing: EP fiber Hackle: Mets Rooster Neck Cement: Hard as Hull
  7. The full back, flash back, bead head, Pheasant Tail (wow thats a mouthful)... Is a great fly! Everyone fishes the flash back pheasant tail, and there are many videos on youtube about how to tie them, but I have yet to find one as a full back flash back. I see these in fly shops all the time though, with the full flash back, but never seen people tie them. I find these full back versions do better when fish are spunky. The more flash on them actually attracts the aggressive fish more, especially on sunny days. I also like tying these heavy, with a bead head and some lead wraps, but you could omit this in your tie if you want. For me though, I like fishing these as my lead fly, something to get the fishes attention, then drop something a little more subtle behind it, even just a regular pheasant tail, or a simple zebra midge. Something without a bead. The extra weight of my lead fly tends to get the whole rig down deep fast, without the need for lead split shot, so it makes a healthier river and easier day on the water not messing with split shot.
  8. The Adams dry fly is one of the most popular dry flies ever created for good reason. It mimics a mayfly perfectly and has proven itself throughout many years of fishing. It is widely effective on many rivers and creeks, and will continue to be for many years to come, if not forever! One of the catskill style flies, this will float high when heavily hackled, has a nice profile, and can be tied in a wide range of sizes. I regularly tie 16-20 with these, but I know of some people tying all the way down to a size 26 and up to a size 10. If you get a Cree hackle, then you can use just one feather rather than two. However cree tends to be much more expensive, so I tie with the double feather method to achieve the brown and grizzly look. As always I am listing the materials I used on this fly. Hook I used: Firehole sticks #419 in size 16 Thread: Brown Veevus 16/0 Tail: Grizzly and Brown Rooster Neck Wings: Grizzly Hen neck Body: Adams Gray, UV2 Fine and Dry dubbing Hackle: Brown and Grizzly Rooster Neck Head cement: Hard as Hull
  9. McFlyLures

    Hares Ear

    The hares ear is a fly that has been around for ages, however its still as effective today as it was many many years ago when it was created. The simplicity is really what makes this fly so popular. Its very easy to tie with a very small amount of materials, yet still catches fish! I have no clue where this fly comes from, and no matter who you talk to, the answer changes. Everyone will say definitely they know, but someone else will say no thats not correct. So as much as I would love to give you an origination story, anything I say will be thought of as a complete utter lie and Bull... sooooo no originaton story for this one, sorry guys! More frequently you see these tied with a tail made of rabbit fur. They would clip a small clump, tie that in at the tail, then dub the body, then tie in a section of turkey wing or pheasant tail fibers for the wing case. I find using the Pheasant tail to start with at the tail negates an extra step, so its much easier and quicker to tie. Also I think it looks better as well, and for me fishes a bit better. So its a win win. Not only is this fly easy to tie, but it also looks really good. Its really cool that you are using the same dubbing throughout to create the abdomen and the thorax, but dubbed in different degree's of tightness to create a different look. The abdomen when dubbed tightly really does have the perfect "bugginess" look to it. And the thorax when dubbed loose will be perfect for looking like legs of nymph. This is really one of my favorite nymphs to fill a box with because its not only effective, looks great, and can be tied to mimic a wide variety of bug species, its very easy and quick to tie, and I can fill a box in a matter of a few hours. It also looks equally as nice with a bead head, and as different sizes as well. Heck, for really small ones try tying with a finer dubbing. Speaking of a wide variety of bug species, these are more than likely made to mimic baetis or mayflies, however I know they can mimic caddis as well. Some people even tie these with slight alterations to look like stoneflies. They are very versatile. As always I am providing a list of materials used on this fly Hook: Firehole Sticks #633 size 6 Thread: Veevus 6/0 Tail/Wing case: Natural Pheasant Tail Ribbing: I used Gold flat tinsel, but round or oval tinsel will work better (or even gold wire) Dubbing: Natural color Hares Ear Plus Resin: Solarez "Thin Hard" UV Resin
  10. These can be tied up very quickly, which is rare to find effective streamer patterns that you can tie so quickly. I can fill up a box in a few hours, and the beauty is that its fairly simple, so it lends to a wide range of color combos as well. Especially since we are using rabbit strips and laser dubbing, both of which have quite a few colors available. Using a cap like this, you really don't have to worry too much about neat heads. In fact, occasionally I mess up my whip finish or how I layer the fly. And the head comes out looking terrible. But thats ok when using these caps, because all your mess-ups at the head are covered by this cap. This fly also is very durable for that reason, a fish will not be able to touch your whip finish with their teeth because that cap is in the way. The cap is fairly heavy though, but they do make plastic weightless caps as well. So if you want a non-weighted streamer you could use them as well. But I do like the jigging motion this steel head gives. And its not overly heavy on these smaller flies, and I was able to cast with a 4wt rod even. As always I am listing all the materials in the description section of this video Hook: Fireholesticks #811 in size 6 - Cap: Fish-Skull Baitfish Heads, small Thread: Olive Veevus Powerthread 140 Tail: Olive Rabbit Zonker Strip Flash Dubbing: Pearl Ice Dub Head Stacking Dubbing: White and Olive, Senyo's Laser Dub Cap Adhesive: Super Glue Gel Eye Resin: Solarez Bone Dry
  11. In my opinion, the Stimulator is one of the best flies for using as an indicator. It floats high, is super buoyant, and mimics a large range of bug species. I could be wrong, but I believe it was originally created to be a stonefly imitator, however it can easily mimic hoppers, and even large caddis if tied to the correct sizes. Being very buoyant means that you can drop a bead head nymph behind it, or another small dry fly. This thing will hold up a large variety of other flies. Also, being such a large size, fish tend to hammer this fly hard! Some of my best strikes, where the fish literally came out of the water, have been with a stimulator. Using different colors of hackle, and dubbing can give you different effects. For my local streams in Colorado, this orange/brown body, with tan/grizzly head works great! But your local streams and rivers might vary. The hook commonly used for this fly is one with long shank, but with a curve to it. The hook I used is from Firehole sticks, but common hooks you can find at most fly shops will be Daiichi 1270 or TMC200. Of course you can use whatever you want, get creative! However a different shaped hook will give it a different look, and won't have that traditional Stimulator body curve to it.
  12. The Matts Midge is really effective for tailwater trout who are very picky with size and look of flies. These things really do look like little midges flying around. I even once had one fall out of my box and landed on my waders without my knowledge, I looked down later and instantly grabbed for my dry flies thinking the midges were hatching. LOL. They are excellent little flies that perfectly mimic a tiny midge. I regularly tie these from size 20-26. I have been known to tie down to 28, but thats as far as I go. I do know a couple brave souls with better eyes than I have, that tie them down to a size 30. So they can be tied small, and this is important when fishing picky tailwater trout. For instance at the San Juan river. This river has trout that are willing to come up and nip at your waders, however will refuse a fly sized 22 if they are targeting size 24. They have learned that they cannot get away from humans on this river, but they can pick and choose what size (and look) of fly they bite. These little matts midges fool them quite often, more often than other dry flies I have seen on that river. And best thing of all, they are one of the easiest dry flies to tie. As always I am including all the materials I used on this fly. You can change up the materials to what suits you, just this is specifically what I used. Hook: Daiichi 1110 size 24 Thread: Black Veevus 16/0 Wing: White CDC Oiler Puff Hackle: Black Whiting or Metz rooster cape Head Cement: Hard as Hull
  13. So the chernobyl ant doesn't really look like an ant. I guess its closer to maybe a hopper imitation? Even that is very suggestive. However this fly seems to produce very well, especially when trout are actively feeding on large terrestrials in the mid to late summer. Not only is this a good trout fly, but it is a great bluegill, panfish fly and bass fly as well. It floats amazingly, and is one of the best indicator type flies out there. By indicator fly, I mean a fly that is large, and able to be seen, that you can use to float a nymph, or see when a small dry fly is taken. So they seem difficult to tie, and for the first dozen or so, you will think its tough. It will take a while to tie your first few, but once you get into a rhythm of tying these, you can crank them out quite quickly. And, the color combination is pretty much endless, with many different colors of foam and rubber legs. Also this fly does well tied in a wide range of sizes as well. So as usual I am listing all the materials used on this fly. Hook: Daiichi 1280 in size 14 Dubbing: Antron dubbing in orange gold Foam: 2mm foam in gold, olive, and orange Legs: grizzly barred rubber legs Cement: Hard as Hull
  14. The elk hair caddis should be a staple in all dry fly fishermans boxes, if they aren't in there already. This fly is probably one of the most effective and versatile dry flies ever created, and is right along side flies like the adams. This is relatively easy to tie, and once you get the hang of it, you can tie quite a few of them in an hour. Fill your box in short time, and have a fly that will fish well at most rivers and streams throughout America, and the rest of the world. The target species is obviously trout, but Ive caught bluegill, bass, and even some saltwater species on this fly before as well. So on my last trip, to Colorado Springs, this fly was the same pattern that Colin ended up landing 6 fish with! It was the most productive fly of the two day trip. So its not only very effective, but relatively easy and cheap to tie. The only expensive part of this fly is the hackle. But once you get a neck, you should be able to tie 100's or even thousands of these flies, in varying sizes. The most common color for hackle is brown, but you can tie it in with other colors as well. Just try to match caddis coloration for your specific area. So as always I am listing the materials used on this fly. Hook: Firehole sticks # 419 in size 16 Thread: Brown Veevus 16/0 Hackle: Brown Rooster Cape Dubbing: Yellow UV2 Fine & Dry Wing: Bleached Elk Hair Head Cement: Hard as hull
  15. The bully bluegill fly seems too simple to catch fish. However that is far from the case. This fly catches fish, and catches them well. In fact, it could be considered one of the best panfish flies out there. It is effective on other fish as well. I have caught bass, catfish and panfish on it. I can imagine you could catch trout and even some saltwater fish as well with the fly. Just the way it sinks is super enticing to panfish, and other species as well. I went out to fish the Guadelupe River just north of San Antonio Texas a short time ago. And this fly was the clear winner of the trip. I caught a 15-16" catfish on it, a bass and quite a few bluegill. The best thing was, I could tie 30-40 of them in an hour, so filling a box was easy. For the hook, I am actually using a dry fly hook because the wire is finer and it gives much easier penetration. But a regular 2x long nymph hook would work as well. Especially if you worry about the hook bending. Hook: Daiichi 1280 in size 14 Weight: .010 Lead wire Thread: White Veevus 6/0 Body: Chartreuse Micro Ultra Chenille Legs: Fine Round Rubber Legs UV Resin: Solarez Ultra Thin
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