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Found 221 results

  1. The RS2 is one of the more simple, yet effective flies out there. Especially for tailwater rivers that require small presentations. This fly looks great all the way down to size 26, and is relatively easy to tie in that size. But you can also fish them up to size 16 or possibly even larger if you so choose. The fly has a limited amount of materials, and once you get the hang of tying these, you can nock them out pretty quickly. They can mimic a midge emerger, or even a baetis emerger deepening on the color and size you tie it. Common colors are black, brown, gray, and olive. Also they can be tied in two tone as well. Build your body with one color dubbing, then add the wing, then make the head with another color dubbing. Gives an interesting look. Try gray/black, olive/brown, and white/black. Or get creative and make your own combo. So I am using a dry fly hook for this, as I like the CDC to actually keep this up off the bottom. How I fish this is behind another fly which is weighted, to keep it down on the bottom, then this fly rides up higher to look like a bug emerging. However if you want this closer to the bottom, you can tie it with a heavier wire nymph hook, and even add some weight with some lead wire if you so choose. But be careful about adding too much lead as it will bulk up your fly. Hook: Daiichi 1110 size 20 Thread: Black Veevus 16/0 Tail: Clear Microfibetts or Mayfly Tails Dubbing: Black UV2 Fine and Dry Wing: White CDC Oiler Puff Glue: Hard as Hull Head Cement
  2. Fly tying Pheasant Tail Nymph https://youtu.be/rZVmm4RoNPE
  3. wet fly for trout https://youtu.be/PyN8YdePHjY
  4. The WD40 was originally designed by Mark Engler. Word on the street says that he designed this while working in a fly shop in the west. He made a pattern that was relatively easy to tie, and worked well in small sizes, which was what was needed on these small fly streams. This fly became so popular at his local fly shop, that he could not keep up with the demand of tying it. So the shop quickly turned to others to tie this fly, and instantly the fly became a world wide success, stocked in all fly shops in the United States, and later the world. So this fly originally uses Wood Duck (the W.D. part of the name). However, wood duck is very expensive for a small amount of it. Also I find that the pattern on it is finer, and softer than Mallard Flank. So I use the less expensive and easier to find mallard flank for this fly. Not only is it more readily available and less expensive than wood duck, it also comes in a wider range of colors. For this specific fly I used the one died to look like wood duck, however you can find this in gray, brown, olive, yellow, exc. The list goes on and on. These range of colors allow you to tie this fly in many colors to mimic your local bug species. So maybe I should call the fly the MF40? LOL So as always I am listing the materials I used on this fly. Hook: Daiichi 1130 in size 18 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in brown Tail/wingcase: Wood Duck Gold Mallard Flank Ribbing: Small/Gold Ultra Wire Dubbing: Brown Hareline Rabbit Dubbing Head Cement: Hard as hull
  5. Soft hackle fly patterns have been around since pretty much when fly fishing started. That does not mean they aren't effective now. In fact, they are still very effective, and in some circumstances more so. They are relatively easy to fish, and fish tend to bite hard on them and will almost rip the rod out of your hand! They are really good at fishing the hard to fish riffles. Cast about 30 degrees down stream, and let the line take the fly. This style of fishing is called swinging. You can either just keep your rod tip still, or shake the rod for a little more action. When you reach the end of your drift, make a few little bumps on the tip of the rod, and leave it for an additional 10 seconds or so. Then take a step or two down stream and repeat. You cover a lot of water, and always seem to entice those super active fish! We all know that is a recipe for a fun fight! This fly is tied in an olive body with porterage hackle. The body is tied a bit fatter than most soft hackles, and it mimics the body of a caddis. The hackle mimics the legs and head of the caddis. Caddis tend to emerge quickly up to the surface, and trout know this. So swinging this fly quickly through fast water is a great way to get bites. These are quite easy to tie once you get the hang of tying in the soft hackle. I can usually tie out 10-20 of them an hour, so I can fill a box quite quickly! Also the materials on this are rather inexpensive, and you really dont use that many. Just a hook, thread, wire, poly yarn, and a porterage feather. Very simple, yet effective! As always I listed the materials I used on this fly. Hook: TMC 3761 in size 14 Thread: Veevus 6/0 in olive Tail: Antron Yarn Wire: Small Gold UTC Ultra Wire Dubbing: Olive/Brown Hares Ear Dubbing Hackle: Hungarian Partridge Cement: Hard as Hull
  6. This WD40 variation is one of my favorites. I like heavy flies for lead flies, and tying it with a Tungsten bead really helps it get down deep. Also the flashiness of the Evil Olive fly helps to attract fish a bit more, when flash might be needed. Slightly stained water or when the fish just aren't as picky. Dropping a small midge, traditional WD40 or even an emerger on the back end of this fly helps get the fish that are a little less anxious to bite. So as always I am listing what materials I used on this fly below the video. Also keep in mind that the list of materials here are just suggestions, and ones I used on this specific fly. That does not mean you have to use these exact colors or products. Experiment, and come up with your own version of this pattern if you want. Or use a different hook, or different thread. These are the materials I find work best, but get creative, or just use what you have. Hook: Firehole Sticks #316 in size 14 Hook: Daiichi 1120 Bead: 2.8mm/Gold Tungsten Bead Thread: Veevus 10/0 in Olive Wire: UTC Ultrawire Small/Gold Tail/Wingcase: Mallard Flank Dubbing: Peacock Ice Dub Legs: Pearl Krystal Flash Resin: Solarez "Thin Hard"
  7. jig streamer https://youtu.be/NrkURcs1X1A
  8. So this fly worked wonders for me last time I went and fished. The fish were destroying it on the top water, and almost coming out of the water after it. It was being hit hard! And I only don't have it anymore because I lost it, and not because it came apart. Its quite durable actually. So as promised here is the list of materials and step by step listed below. Materials.... Hook: Daiichi 1270 in size 18 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in olive Tail: White Polypro Yarn Ribbing: Veevus 140 Power thread in brown Dubbing: FTD's Skeeter Fuzz in caddis green Wing: Primo Deer Hair Strips died yellow or gold Hackle: Genetic Rooster Cape in Olive Head Cement: Bone Dry UV Curing Resin Step by Step.... Step 1: Start your thread half way down the bend of the hook. Step 2: Tie in a strand of 140 power thread Step 3: Tie in a few strands of polypro Step 4: Tie both the thread and polypro down deep into the bend of the hook Step 5: Dub a tapered noodle onto your thread with your dubbing Step 6: Wind the dubbing up the hook shank creating a tapered body Step 7: Make spaced wraps with the thread up the abdomen to create ribs Step 8: Trim off a fair amount of deer hair Step 9: Prepare that deer hair by removing the underfur, and aligning the tips in your stacker Step 10: Tie the prepared hair onto the top of your fly insuring the hair extends to about the end of the hook Step 11: Trim off the waste of the hair Step 12: Clean up the head Step 13: Dub on a bit more dubbing and create a bit of a tapered head Step 14: Prepare an appropriate sized hackle feather by cutting off the fuzzy parts, and snipping off the lower fibers. Step 15: Tie in the hackle so the shiny side is facing you Step 16: Wrap your hackle around the head as many times as you can to create a very thick and bushy head Step 17: Capture the hackle carefully insuring not to trap any fibers, pull all fibers rearward, and then tie back up onto the hackle a bit to insure no fibers are caught and facing forward. Step 18: Trim off the waste hackle Step 19: Whip finish your fly Step 20: Cement the head Last step: Fish your fly!
  9. Carp are a tough fish to fish for. However, they are really rewarding when you finally hook into one. They pull like a freight train, and are challenging to even hook. Many times you have to go with lighter line, and small flies, which makes it tough to bring them in. Here is a fly that is tied to swim hook point up. You are going to be fishing carp on the bottom for the majority of the time, so this fly needs to be somewhat weedless. Being hook point up really helps with that. Last time I went out fishing for carp though, I ended up hooking into a really nice brown trout, on this pattern. So it obviously will work on more than just carp. Below is a list of materials, and below that is a step by step on how to tie this fly. Materials: Hook: Firehole sticks #516 in size 10 Bead: 3.2mm black tungsten slotted bead Thread: Veevus 10/0 in red Tail/Body: Medium "ultra chenille" in red Collar: Brown Marabou Cement: Hard as Hull Tying Instructions: Step 1 - Put the bead onto your hook Step 2 - Start your thread right behind the bead Step 3 - Measure out your chenille to 3 times the length of the hook Step 4 - Tie in your chenille right behind the bead, and on top of the hook shank, and down deep into the bend of the hook Step 5 - Tie in another piece of chenille on top of the hook shank, tying it back to where you tied down the other piece of chenille Step 6 - Make touching wraps up the hook shank with your chenille stopping a bead length shy of the bead. Step 7 - Make a dubbing loop with your thread Step 8 - Pull off the fibers of the marabou feather Step 8 - Place those fibers in the dubbing loop, so the tips extend out to just past the length of the hook. Step 9 - Spin up your dubbing loop Step 10 - Wrap your marabou hackle around the hook shank, pulling all the fibers rearward with every wrap Step 11 - Whip finish your fly. Step 12 - Add a drop of head cement to keep the whip finish in place Step 13 - Burn the end of the chenille with a lighter to give it a taper Most important Step - Fish your FLY!
  10. I recently came up with a small jigging type of minnow pattern for someone who wanted a few tied up. After tying it, I realized it would be perfect for jigging for panfish. So I made it brighter and shinier and settled on this pattern. It jigs nicely, and also has some good movement when stripped through the water, and also jigged off the bottom. It rides hook point up, and therefor its more snag resistant. Materials I used on this fly Hook: Firehole sticks #516 in size 10 Bead: Slotted Silver Tusten bead size 2.8mm Weight: .010 sized lead wire Thread: Veevus 140 power thread in hot orange Tail: Hot pink ice dub Body: Chartreuse starburst dubbing Head: Red rabbit dubbing Eyes: 5mm 3D eyes 1st UV resin: Solarez "thin hard" 2nd UV resin: Solarez "ultra thin"
  11. I had one of my subscribers ask me to tie up a few of these for him. They are good flies, and I have tied them up for him in the past. He said they were effective and durable, and wanted more. So I decided to tie them for you guys as well, and make a video on them. Fathead minnows are a common food source for predatory fish in many parts of the US, and this fly mimics a larger sized one pretty well. They have a dark lateral line down their body, and a dark head. The head is also really fat. So this fly works as a great imitation. Here is a list of materials I used on this fly. Hook: Gamakatsu B10S in size 6 Thread: Veevus power thread 140 in brown Weight: .025 sized lead wire Tail: Arctic wind dubbing in black Body: Arctic wind dubbing in white Back: Arctic wind dubbing in tan Head: Arctic wind dubbing in brown Head cement: Solarez "Bone Dry" ultra thin UV curing resin
  12. I'm an avid outdoorsman. I have access to different natural materials for tying flies. I recently obtained a skin from a turkey. I found many different types of feathers I think can be used in place of maribou. Has anyone ever tried using turkey down? And can it be dyed? If so, how.
  13. This is a popular fly! In the last few weeks, I have been asked to tie this in different color patterns. First I tied in a baby brown trout coloration, and then someone asked me to tie it in a rainbow trout color. Now, someone recently asked me to tie this in a perch color. So here it is! This subscriber of mine said he fishes a lake called Navajo Lake, and I have fished it a few times before. There are no baitfish other than perch and bluegill in that lake. So it makes sense that he would want this coloration of a fly. Its a good little fly, and very effective! Check out the underwater movement! And this has been a very effective fly in many of the colorations I have tied it in. So I have no doubt it will work wonders in this color pattern as well. As always, here is a list of the materials I used on this fly. You are welcome to try other materials, and you do not have to stick to these, however I am listing them to help you know what I specifically used. Hook: Gamakatsu B10S in size 2 Thread: Veevus Power Thread 140 in hot orange Weight: Large red painted lead dumbbell eyes Body: Ice Dub in pearl and orange Tail: Barred yellow magnum rabbit strip Head: Senyo's laser dub in white and olive Head Cement: Solarez Bone Dry UV Resin
  14. Coming into spring, dry fly season is right around the corner. Up where I live, we get grasshoppers jumping off the banks and into the water pretty early in the season. However most of our hoppers are not too large, and it is tough for some of the smaller creek fish to take a large grasshopper pattern. I wanted to make one small, and this one is quite small. Tied on a size 10 hook, its small enough to fit in a small trouts mouth. Also it mimics the size of the local grasshoppers that the fish are eating on. These hoppers are yellow, tan and brown. So thats the color pattern I am tying them in. Not only is this fly effective, it is very durable. I have yet to have a fly come apart even after a few hard takes from fish. Here is a list of materials I used on this fly. Hook: TMC 100 in size 10 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in tan Abdomen: 2mm tan fly foam Dubbing: Vaca dry fly dubbing in hopper yellow Head: 2mm tan and brown fly foam Wing: Congo hair in medium brown Hot Spot: 2mm yellow fly foam Legs: centipede legs in speckled white Glue: Paint on gorilla glue
  15. This fly works awesomely for bass. I have tied it in many color combos already. One perch coloration, a baby brown trout coloration, and now a baby rainbow coloration. I have caught quite a few bass on this fly. Its one of my best producers for fishing my local lake (navajo lake) in New Mexico. My buddy Kyle and I were fishing last summer and we probably caught 20+ fish each and were fishing this pattern most of the day. Just in a perch color. Here are the materials I used on this fly. Hook: Gamakatsu B10S in size 2 - Thread: Veevus Power Thread 140 in Olive - Weight: Large Lead Painted Dumbbell - Accent: Ice Dubbing in Pearl and Pink - Tail: Magnum Rabbit Strip in White - Dubbed head: Lazer Dubbing in Olive and White - Head Cement: Bone Dry UV Resin -
  16. The Frenchie is commonly tied on a jig hook, and usually fished by euro nymphing style. However the same fly can be tied on a traditional nymph hook and is also quite effective fished under an indicator as well. In fact, I had some great luck with this fly on my last trip to the Animas. I tie these small for my local rivers, but you can tie them much larger if you want. The materials I used... Hook: TMC 3761 on size 16 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in Red Bead: 2.8mm Gold Tungsten Bead Weight: .010 lead wire Tail/body: Pheasant Tail Fibers Ribbing: UTC Small Gold Wire Collar: UV Shrimp Pink Ice Dub Glue: Hard as Hull Head Cement
  17. Well lets be honest here, this is not the easiest fly in the world to tie. However, the versatility of it, and the effectiveness is absolutely amazing! Its also durable, and has the ability to interchange the tails so you can really have a few flies in one. With foam towards the back of the fly, and the weight added by the UV resin head, this fly walks the dog effortlessly. Its perfect for top water bass fishing. Materials I used for the fly body Hook 1: Gamakatsu B10S in size 2 Thread: Veevus Power Thread 140 in Olive Wire: Senyo's Standard Trailer Wire Foam: Hairline 2mm Fly Foam Body: Crinoline Tubing Eyes: Brule 3D Hard Epoxy Fish Eyes Head Building Resin: Solarez "Thin Hard" UV Resin Paint On Resin: Solarez "Ultra Thin" UV Resin Split Ring: Materials I used on the tails Hook: Gamakatsu B10S in size 6 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in white Feathers: Bugger Pack in white and grizzly Rubber tail: Cohen's attractor tails small Shank: FTD Fish Joints 5/8" Head Cement: Solarez "Ultra Thin" UV Resin
  18. You need a flashy annelid pattern? Well look no further! About as flashy as it gets right here! Bright, noticeable, great for off color water, or just to make a statement! HAHA I use these as attractors. They work well like that. Then I drop a more realistic pattern behind it. They are easy and quick to tie, and quite effective. What more could you ask for? Materials used: Hook: Daiichi 1273 in size 22 Thread: Veevus 16/0 in red Body Wrap: Hot Yellow Pearl Krystal Flash Dubbing: Hairline Rabbit Dubbing in red Cement: Hard as Hull
  19. So obviously I named this fly after the US president's hairline. Sorry to anyone I am offending, I mean no offense. I didnt tie it with that idea in mind, but when it came out of the vice, I thought to myself, dang that looks familiar. And I am not trying to get political, so any hateful comments will be deleted no matter what side of the fence they are from. This is a fly tying channel, not a political channel. No negative comments about the president, and no negative comments about the presidents opposition please. With that aside, I want to discuss the fly itself. I tied it with an idea in mind, to create a simple and quick shrimp that will be effective. This fly can be tied in about 10 minutes when you get the hang of it, and it does seem to move very nicely in the water. In fact my buddy that still lives near saltwater gave it a try and said he did well with it. So, Im really glad with the results. I also really love these custom eyes. I think they really add to this fly, and any other shrimp fly patterns. Hook: Ahrex NS-122 in size 8 Thread: Veevus power thread 140 in fl. orange Legs: Barred Rubber Legs Eyes: Custom Mono Shrimp Eyes Body Wrap: Cactus Chenille Spike Wing: Extra Select Craft Fur in Tan Head Cement: Solarez "Ultra Thin" UV Resin
  20. Sometimes you want to fill up a box with some caddis. When doing so, you dont always want a fly that take a long time to tie, instead you want something thats quick and easy. Well this is that fly. This caddis pupa is quite simple and quick to tie, and you can tie 8-10 an hour. They work with multiple sized hooks, and you can even use different colors as well. It is easy, and effective, which is what you want in a fly. Something you dont mind loosing too much, and something you can tie up easily, to insure you always have it in your box. Hook: Firehole Sticks #316 in size 12 Weight: Lead Wire in .010 and .025 sizes Thread: Veevus 10/0 in Brown Ribbing: Small D-Rib in Olive Dubbing: Hairtron in Olive and Brown Head Cement: Solarez "Ultra Thin"
  21. This fly is one that a friend showed me a while back. In fact you saw me fish with him this past summer. Kyle is his name, and he is the one who took me out on his bass boat to fly fish for some smallmouth bass. He had one of these flies that he said he used for months, and caught probably 100 bass on. It was so durable, and very effective. So of course I went home and tied a few. And sure enough, these are effective and durable. This version I changed up the colors a bit, and some of the materials. Mainly the dubbing used. Its very good quality dubbing, and the synthetic mixed with the natural really makes a unique dubbing. I like this version, and the color pattern really works as a baby brown trout imitation. Materials I used: Hook: Gamakatsu B10S in size 2 Thread: Veevus Power Thread 140 in Brown Weight: Large Painted Lead Dumbbell Eyes Dubbing: Monster Dubbing in Dark Brown, Yellow and White Wing: Magnum Rabbit Zonker in Chinchilla UV Resin: Solarez "Ultra Thin"
  22. These flies are easy to tie, and very effective on many species across the fly fishing spectrum. From freshwater fish including trout, bass and walleye, to saltwater fish like speckled trout, redfish, striper, and false albacore, This fly will catch just about any fish that is predatory on smaller baitfish. Its also pretty durable, and will last through many hard strikes from toothy fish. The movement from the craft fur is incredible, and really does seem to be very realistic. The fly also looks great, and has just the right amount of sparkle to attract the fish, but not spook them. It can be tied in a wide range of colors as well. I tie this on a Gamakatsu SS15 hook in size 2, but you can use a heavier wire hook for larger fish species, and a thinner hook for trout. You want the length of the hook shaft to be about the same though, so keep that in mind. Also, you can use a stronger thread than I used, just if its thicker, make sure and use less thread wraps. I prefer the thinner personally because its easier to keep the materials situated and even with it. To give some extra weight to this fly, you could make a few wraps with some lead wire as well. But I prefer this fly to suspend or slowly sink the way it does. Hook: Gamakatsu SS15 in size 2 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in brown Hook Wrap: UTC Sparkle Braid in tan Fiber: Extra Select Craft Fur in white, tan, and dark brown Eyes: 3D eyes in 5-6mm UV Resin: Solarez Thin Formula, and Solarez "Bone Dry" Ultra Thin Formula
  23. This video is a bit different, its more of a comparison between two materials. The synthetic bucktail, and real bucktail. From my opinion, I think they both have unique properties and differences, so much so that I really think the should be different named materials all together. Faux bucktail is somewhat misleading as its not exactly the same as the real stuff. In some ways its better, and in some ways its worse. For certain applications it could be better, and for certain applications it could be worse. So thats my conclusion. Hook: Gamakatsu SS15 in size 2 Eyes: Lead Painted Dumbell Eyes in large and red Thread: Danville 210 Flat Waxed in White Material: Real and Faux Bucktail in white/olive Head Cement: Solarez "Bone Dry"
  24. This fly is one I created to nymph for trout at my local river after the hatch. On the Animas, the rainbow trout and brown trout eggs start hatching, and there are tons of little fry that become food for the larger trout. I used to nymph a white rabbit leech for them, but I wanted to create a more realistic baitfish profile to catch them with. Being completely coated with UV resin, this fly will be very durable, and able to withstand many fish strikes from toothy brown trout. Also, I find this fly to not be too difficult to tie. Materials I used on this fly. Hook: Umqua U301 in size 12 Weight: .015 lead wire Thread: Veevus 16/0 in olive Tail: Marabou in Olive Body Wrap: Tinsel Twist in Olive and Red Back: Peacock Hurl Belly: Pearl Crystal Flash Eyes: 2mm 3D eyes 1st Coat Resin - Solarez "Thin Hard" Formula 2nd Coat Resin - Solarez "Bone Dry" Formula
  25. Red Annelids are a very important and common food source for trout in almost every river in the world. In many rivers like my local river (The San Juan River) trout will gorge themselves on these small yet high protein worms. This means that using flies that mimic them will yield high results. The red hook is a popular hook for mimicking these red annelids. You can literally just fish the hook, without anything on it. Many guides do this because their clients loose so many flies, it makes short work of loading their boxes with annelid patterns. And it hurts less when they are lost. However, we who love to tie flies have some other options of this popular fly. Including this one, which uses some micro tubing for ribbing and a black head. Here is the list of materials I used on the fly. Hook: Daiitchi 1273 in size 20 Thread: Veevus 14/0 in black Wrap: Micro Tubing in Yellow Head Cement: Bone Dry UV Curing Resin
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