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JoeFish

lake fly fishing for trout

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well usually, i do it in rivers, but what do I do for trout in lakes?

 

I would guess lots of streamers.

 

how do i fish nymphs in lakes? they all cant possibly be the same types that are in rivers can they? dunno.gif

 

do dries fish the same?

 

I really have no idea.

 

I guess i should put this on TFF unsure.gif

 

Joe

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QUOTE (swinks1966 @ Jun 25 2005, 11:37 AM)
well usually, i do it in rivers, but what do I do for trout in lakes?

I would guess lots of streamers.

how do i fish nymphs in lakes? they all cant possibly be the same types that are in rivers can they? dunno.gif

do dries fish the same?

The important thing to remember about lake fishing for trout is that trout move to the food instead of the food moving to the trout. In a river, trout can hide behind a boulder or in a pool and the current brings them everything they need. In a lake, the fish cruise looking for a meal.

 

There are 3 good ways to get started lake fishing.

 

The first one is to cast streamers and a sinking line. Cast, count the seconds while your line sinks, then pull in the streamer with 12-inch strips or so. It's not too scientific, but experiment with fast and slow retrievals and waiting different counts for your line to sink. Try the basic woollybugger in black or any other favorite streamer, since whatever you are using for rivers works here too.

 

The one that you are most likely used to is with dries. Cast and wait. Use a longer leader than you would for a stream because there are no ripples to obscure your line, so it has to be farther from the fly. Try the gulper special or a callibaetis.

 

Nymphing is harder to get the hang of, but it's fun. You can use an indicator and a floating line. I have a 10-foot clear sinktip that I use for nymphs which works like a dream. The retrieve is a slowish strip, but I've had good results with a "wrist-pop" retrieve for some reason. Try any good nymph, but think about #14 hare's ear, zug bug, damselfly, or a chironimid pupa.

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Hey swinks... Here in BC we've got some of the best lake fishing on the planet. However, and that is definitely a capital H, there are dozens of ways to fish a lake.

 

In fact, you can approach the same lake 12 different ways depending on the time of year. Tunkwa, for example, is an excellent chronomid lake but whether you sit in the "deeper" waters or in 2' - 4' depends on where the bugs are. At times the fish are targeting immature damsel nymphs near shore, or migrating caddis on the bottom, or scuds, or leeches if they need a bit of dessert.

 

Time of year, topology, foliage, availability of food, elevation, etc. all contribute to the techniques an angler can use.

 

You may want to pick up Phillip Rowley's 'Fly Patterns for Stillwaters' , or Alfred G. Davy's 'The Gilly'. Both are excellent resources for stillwater fishing.

 

Good luck.

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I second the book selection. Phil's book has some interesting data about what trout feed on in different seasons. I have seen some of the pictures of the trout in BC that are as big as 25lbs blink.gif When fish are feeding on the surface, I tend to dry fly fish, and when there is no activity, I will cast streamers, or set up a dry line with a strike indicator and adust the depth I'm fishing from 5 - 18' depending on where the fish start to bite. Hot days, this works well when the fish go to deeper cooler water.

 

The guys in BC sure know how to catch trout out of lakes. smile.gif

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When you get into a lake that has more drop-offs than Tunkwa, which is primarly shallow (deepest spot is about 20'). Concentrate on these drop offs. If the fish are on the drop off cast out with a sinking line (a variety of flies can be used-damsel nymph, dragon nymph, leeches, shrimp, nymphs...etc), and experiment with how long you let it sink and how fast your retrival is. If they are on the shoals, I primarly stick to chronimids, but there are imitaions you can use here (waterboatman, shrimp). I primarly use a floating line with a strike indicator. However, I have used an intermidiate line and retreived slowly with shrimp as well and have great success.

 

With surface flies, presentation is key. You need long leaders, much longer than you would in the river. The fish get spooked so much easier. I tend to let it sit there for a minute or so before retreiving (gives fish time to get back into position).

 

When you head out on the lake, definalty ask around where the best fishing is on the lake, just like a river.

 

Good luck, and happy fishing!

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