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BoSmith

Lake Flys

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Hello all, I'm relatively new to fly fishing, but have been loving doing it so far. This week I am headed up north for some brookie fishing in a lake. I have never done this before. My go's to so far are wooly buggers, and clousers. Can anyone make any suggestions as to what other flys may produce in such a situation?

Thanks

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BoSmith,

 

I recommend that you do a quick search of this site for the word "stillwater". There was a number of excellent postings for lake and pond (aka - stillwater) type fishing. There are a number of posts that asked people to post photos of their stillwater fly patterns (leeches, chronomids, damsel fly nymphs, dragon fly nymphs, and minnow patterns).

 

I would recommend any patterns created by the following gentlemen:

 

Denny Rickards

Here is a link to his website (Look under the section \Products\Flies to see his patterns)

(http://www.flyfishingstillwaters.com/)

 

Philip Rowley and Brian Chan

Here is a link to their patterns

http://www.superfly.ca/files/sw_fly_brochure.pdf

 

Cabela's carries a DVD specifically for stillwater fly fishing, which may be helpful to you.

http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0043418319805a.shtml

 

All three of these gentlemen have written books and have videos showing how to fish non-moving bodies of water. I've got a number of them and would highly recommend them.

 

Good luck fishing.

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#6 beadhead weighted olive wolly bugger, #4 muddler minnow, and up to a #2 grey ghost. A montreal wet fly is deadly in lakes here.

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No experience, but I've read in numerous places that dragonfly and damselflly nymph patterns are "musts" for lake fishing.

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According to Phil Rowley, in Fly Paterns for Stillwaters, 40% of the trout's year-round diet consists of chironomids (midges,or diptera). One reason may be that chironomids offer the most prolonged hatch of the season. Ascending or suspended midge pupae are vulnerable targets. I've had good luck with red/maroon, black, and olive pupae patterns.

 

The pie chart will also give you some ideas for other bugs.

 

IPB Image

 

Here's also a natural pupae suspended at the surface and a chironomid pattern, the Striptease Midge Pupa:

 

IPB Image

 

IPB Image

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Lakes typically have many types of food available to trout and the productive patterns can change in the blink of an eye.

 

Some of the lakes I fish in the Sierras can have mayflies hatching like crazy as light and water temps reach a certain trigger, some of these hatches can last a month.

 

The rest of the year the same mayfly is available only in small quantities. It's best to know your lake - the result of many visits, so you can learn some of the timetables that affect the fishing.

 

Nothing hurts more than showing up with a box full of one thing, when all the fish suddenly shift to something you don't have.

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Lake flies,

Fall fishing lakes can be lots of fun. The flies to use are shrimp/scuds, leeches, dragonflies, imature damsels, water boatman, and of course my favorite chironomids. Its the time of year to use species that live on the bottom of the lake, but keep in mind the fish move into the shoal areas to feed, so fish up to the reeds. You can fish in as little as 2 feet.

kt

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This week I am headed up north for some brookie fishing in a lake. I have never done this before. Thanks

 

 

I know this is coming in a little late- but my experiences with brookies in ponds and lakes in Maine taught me to avoid overcomplicating things. Light and dark woolly worms and woolly buggers, both lightly weighted and unweighted, and some white, yellow, and black marabou streamers pretty much covered things. A few generic damsel-type nymphs, and a few rather largish generic dries worked good too.

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Years ago when I was stationed in New Mexico we would look forward to October for high mountain lake fishing; usually lakes in the Jemez Mountains. The browns become very active, especially at night and almost any large dark wooly worm (#6 3x olive is the best). Fished slow just below the surface would usually get one of two responses; a light tap tap as if it were a bat hitting your line or a bone jarring hit that can almost scare you. There is just something mystical about wading at dark in a lake and fly fishing for large trout; you don't even seem to notice that the temperature drops below freezing. During the day I found a variety of patterns from any fore and aft to damsels work well and often with a midge pupa as a dropper.

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I don't know if it's too late or not, but I have some good experience with lake fishing.

I am a guide at the Coopers Minipi camps. There are a lot of factors that would have an influence on what kind of fishing you will be doing ie size of fish, time of year and location. The best thing to do would be to talk to the guides and figure out what works in that particular spot at that time of year. If there's one thing that I'v learned, it's that you can't predict what's going to happen, and that local knowledge is of the utmost importance.

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