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What Vise do you use?

What is your primary vise?  

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Had old fixed clamp vise for years that came with my first tying kit plus the one my father had before that. Very durable but lacking in many regards. I did a ton of research, read forums like this, watched, watched videos of real tyers, and found a good number of them use the Peak rotary vise for about 149$ So I got one and I love it. Heavy base and is not going to move, your thread will break first, yet still maneuverable. Smooth rotation. Very well built. I would say it's the best bang for your buck for a "nice" vise.

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I've been using a danvice for 3 years now and have been fairly happy with it. Not a bad vice for the price tag. I will probably be upgrading to a griffin soon though.

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I've been using a danvice for 3 years now and have been fairly happy with it. Not a bad vice for the price tag. I will probably be upgrading to a griffin soon though.

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Yes, at least one member here has built a copy. Follow this link for one.

 

Mine is a genuine Nor-vise.

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Well I am new to this website and come tomorrow will be new to fly tying. I have only been fly fishing since I moved from the US to Germany (1.5 yrs ago). You are not allowed to bow hunt in Germany so I figured I would take up trout fishing. I fell in love with it and now that the winter is coming I want to get into fly tying. I have been reading this specific blog for the past few nights and there are just so many choices.... so I did what one suggested and just went down to the local German fly shop and asked for a lesson... my first one is tomorrow... after then hopefully I will have a better understanding of the vise and tools that will best for me (Tying trout flies). It looked like they use the Danvise there, but after reading hours of these blogs I will most likely look into the HMH Spartan, the Peak, Apex, or Atlas.... they seem to all be near my price range and the ones most people have talked about on this site. Anyway once I make up my mind or if anyone has any suggestions on these... I can post back and let someone else looking for the same info I was looking for what I got..

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I would stay off the Danvise. I have one. It's okay for the price, but for bigger flies, it just doesn't cut it. It lacks room behind the fly. And it's basically plastic except the jaws.

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I have been tying on a Renzetti for almost 20 years, and yes it is the same vise and the same jaws. I can not complain about anything on the Renzetti. I bought the vise when I was 15, because I wanted something that would last, let me tell you it has done much more than last. You can't go wrong with the Renzetti traveler, I recommend it to all my students.

 

Lee

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I bought a Peak Vice 6 or so years ago, I like it a lot. Local Colorado company, so that is a big plus. I like that I can use the rotary function for ribbing and hackle, if needed or not. I haven't had any real problems with it, but it is the first vice I have had that was over $100...

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I generally use a Renzetti Presentation vice but also have a regular (rotary but not true rotary) Dyna-King I use for Clousers and similar. I have been using my brother-in-law's Dyna-King Barracuda recently. It's a super vice and is sort of like a Renzetti Presentation on steroids. Having the luxury of these vices, I use the Barracuda on large salt water flies and bass bugs and the Presentation on "regular" flies. If I had to choose just one, although I don't know why I'd do that, I'd go with the Presentation, JMHO. If all I tied was larger salt water flies, I'd sure go with the Barracuda.

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Well, I was trying to decide which rotary vise to get and I chose the RenZetti Traveler, which to me seemed a little fragile but was a good vise, until the day that the jaw retaining machine screw snapped in half. Wow, was that a hassle, trying to find a replacement part, contacted the company and they were all brain dead, or acted like it anyways. So, here I was stuck with a $200 vise I couldn't use, and couldn't repair. To top it off,when I took the broken screw out, the little spring, did its thing, and sprung...right out of the vise into a miniature black hole or something...never found it and I went over the floor with a hand held magnet and magnifying glass looking...so, despondent, had an epiphany....took the machine screw to Home Depot, and managed to find a perfect replacement screw in their hardware section....and use a screw from a large ink pen, cut it in half with cutters, and voila'!! One repaired Renzetti traveler...

 

But here's the real story, it was about three weeks between it breaking and its repair...couldn't go without a rotary vise for that long, so scooped a Danvise, one of the new plastic rotary jobs, for a temporary replacement and it was only $75. Now, I have a Renzetti Traveler rotary vise, repaired, for sale. Started using the rotary Danvise, and fell in love with it. The over large head gives me a place to rest my hand while tying in materials, and since I have been on a deer hair spinning trip for the last few months, having a place to rest your hand is nice, after all the time it takes to prepare deer hair for spinning...must have gotten a deer that was taken during the coldest part of winter because it has so much of that pain in the vise underfur....almost impossible to get it all out.

 

One thing about spinning deer hair flies though, pack them as tight as you can, even when it seems there is no more room on the hook, try this little trick I read about. Place a drop of Krazy Glue on the threads from the bunch you just put on the hook, and before (can't stress that enough) it dries, take a pair of tweezers that are not sharp at the end, put them along side of the hook shank and use the tweezers to push the threads as far back as you can. I actually took a long pair of tweezers, and got some of that Handle Dipping rubber they selll at Home Depot, the kind you coat old screwdriver handles and such, and dipped the tweezers into the rubber, so when I push the threads back there is no chance of cutting them with the tweezers. Works great and you can really pack that deer hair onto a hook shank using that method. If you steam the fly after putting all the deer hair on it, before you start trimming, the steam will expand the deer hair and really make it nice and compact.

 

Now, if I could just figure out the stacking method for multiple colors I'd be able to create some "bragging right" flies, but still working that technique...

 

Try the tweezer trick, works.

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