Jump to content
Fly Tying
Sign in to follow this  
Piker20

UV resins when used with Cyanoacrylate glues

Recommended Posts

Hi folks. For those unfamiliar with any issues, at least one brand of UV cured resin; although looking on other forums it's not unique, cure a milky white colour if they come into contact with Cyanoacrylate glues and or wet materials. So much so that one company will only suggest using its own brand of glue with their product. This put me off UV resins for the last year and I hope this info might be of use to someone else. I have no association to any product or firm, this is just my personal opinion based on using the products.

I have been using Gorilla Glue (the waterproof standard glue not their superglue) and have now started using a brand of UV resin called Mr Bond. I'm sure Mr Bond is just the same stuff with a different label as many other brands of UV resin. I can say that if given 24hours to cure the Mr Bond resin has no problems when applied over the Gorilla glue. I think that Gorilla glue will be safe with mostly all the UV resins. Crotalus has kindly said he will try to test CCG with Cyanoacrylate glue as he doesn't think this is affected by the milky clouding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use quite a bit of cyano glue (the brand I favor is Krazy Glue, original formula) in my tying. I use it as a stand alone with no finish and also with either Sally Hansen Hard as Nails or a rodbuilder's finish, FlexCoat (I use the rodbuilder's finish after painting on eyes typically since it's not solvent based at all)... The only time I ever have a problem is if I get in a hurry and don't allow the "super glue" to cure out properly. Although I don't use any of the new UV activated finishes I'd recommend that those that do use them do a couple of test runs after any super glue is allowed to dry thoroughly -that should clearly show whether there's any compatibility problems between the two chemical compounds. Hope this helps

 

Tight Lines

Bob LeMay

(954) 435-5666

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't had that happen yet. I wonder if the CA was fully cured?? Even though CA will stick your fingers together in the blink of an eye, it often takes a couple hours to fully cure and crystalize.

 

Kirk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why use both ca and uv goo together?

 

why not just the uv goo alone?

 

ca cures by moisture/humidity so if its not dry before an application of wet uv goo then cured by the uv light then the ca cant cure??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my case it was old CA glue on the bodkin i used to apply UV resin and CA glue that stuck eyes on then the UV formed a head which then went cloudy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Piker, I guess that rules out the question of letting the CA cure long enough.

 

Flytire, there is one instance in particular that I personally use CA and UV.I use CA to glue a soft foam head to a hook, residual CA will squeeze out and then I may topcoat the soft foam with UV. There are probably other instances as well.

 

Kirk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
why use both ca and uv goo together?

 

why not just the uv goo alone?

 

ca cures by moisture/humidity so if its not dry before an application of wet uv goo then cured by the uv light then the ca cant cure??

 

Not to speak for piker, but I like to add 3D eyes to the thread head area of some larger bass streamers. My usual practice is to "tack" the eyes in place with a drop of gel CA to ensure that the eyes stay put when I fill the gaps on top and bottom between the eyes with UV Knot Sense, then cure with the UV light. I'm sure it could be done without the drop of gel CA, but for me the eyes wanted to move slightly, and me being a perfectionist, I use the CA gel to make darn sure the eyes stay where I want them while I apply the UV cure stuff.

 

And I have never had an issue with that combination curing anything but clear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's second thumbs up for loon and CA. I'm happy with gorilla glue at present and don't run the risk of sticking fingers to everything. Hopefully this thread will help any folk who do find themselves with the milky problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get that you can use both ca glues and uv goos in the same area. That really wasn't the question. My fault for not being perfect.

 

Does the ca glue need to completely dry BEFORE coating with the uv goo or can it be applied over wet ca glues?

 

Does the application of the uv goo over wet ca glues prohibit the natural drying process of the ca glue?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen quite a few paint jobs on cars and motorcycles go crazy because the primer wasn't completely dry before the top coats of paint were applied. The paint will take on a milky or blushed look usually and in extreme cases it will "solvent pop" and appear to have pimples all over it. I have also seen areas where a flexible bumper tear was hot stapled and then epoxied over and apparently not allowed to cure properly and then the repaired area really show up in a day or two. I know its not the same as crazy glue but I'm guessing its about the same principle. The uv resin may have a chemical in it that broke down or released something from the dried ca glue that was just enough to cloud it. I still haven't got to try any uv resin and am by no means an authority on it but I have used just about every type of paint or auto body chemical available and a few of the rules to finishing or refinishing something is to be sure the underlying coats of whatever it may be is completely dry before proceeding to the next step and always use clean, non-contaminated tools. Whenever paint or epoxy or anything else is used, Murphy's law will bite you in the rear if you are not very careful. I think Kirk does some amazing work and has used a lot of different paints and materials over the years and he has more than likely been introduced to Mr. Murphy a time of two and understands exactly what I am saying. Piker, just get yourself some acetone and then use all the crazy glue you want and then you can use a q-tip or something dipped in the acetone to release your fingers from wherever they may be glued.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's one last trick about CA adhesives from a guy who uses a quite a bit of the stuff.... any excess CA that winds up on fingers or hands is easily dealt with -immediately wet the area with water or saliva and you kill the adhesive effect. By the way, anytime you do that the CA residue will immediately turn white...

 

Afterwards the stuff is stubborn and takes some scrubbing to remove -but while it's still wet any water will kill it cold...

 

Tight Lines

Bob LeMay

(954) 435-5666

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I get that you can use both ca glues and uv goos in the same area. That really wasn't the question. My fault for not being perfect.

 

Does the ca glue need to completely dry BEFORE coating with the uv goo or can it be applied over wet ca glues?

 

Does the application of the uv goo over wet ca glues prohibit the natural drying process of the ca glue?

 

For me, to answer your questions, I don't need the CA to be completely cured/dry before applying UV cure. The simple reason for why is that by the time I apply the UV it doesn't matter whether the CA is 100% cured or not, it has served its purpose, which was to tack the eyes in place while I fill gaps and finish the head with UV cure acrylic and often a top coat of something like Hard as Hull after that. I just need the CA to cure enough that the eyes don't move or fall off or slip around while I add the UV cure acrylic. I tied a few streamers last night that I added 3D eyes to and did this same process. I don't care if the CA ever truly cures, as long as it holds the eyes in place while I fill the gaps with UV cure, it has served its purpose. Curing the UV and then topping it with HaH to seal the entire "head" renders the status of the CA gel completely meaningless. The eyes aren't going anywhere at that point, whether the CA is cured or not. And from what I can tell, there are no side effects to uncured CA under the UV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a lot of zap a gap thin..when I apply I immediately blot with a paper towel. Takes off all the excess and dries almost immediately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didnt notice any cloudy look to the CCG that I put over the Loctite gel that I use.

 

 

I get that you can use both ca glues and uv goos in the same area. That really wasn't the question. My fault for not being perfect.

 

Does the ca glue need to completely dry BEFORE coating with the uv goo or can it be applied over wet ca glues?

 

Does the application of the uv goo over wet ca glues prohibit the natural drying process of the ca glue?

 

I dont usually let the CA glue cure completely as i am only using it to hold the eyes in place until i can get the head coated with CCG. Glue one eye, glue the second eye, coat and cure. Once the eye is encased in CCG the CA glue is unnecessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...