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intresting article about not liking fly tying

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I thought you guys might like to read this article I found. It is about a guy frustrated with tying. Good short read.

 

http://www.thesilentpursuit.com/2015/02/13/fly-tying-sucks/?fb_ref=Default&fb_source=message

 

Also included in the article was this one about the cost of tying.

 

http://www.flyfishfood.com/2015/02/tying-vs-buying-which-costs-more.html?m=1

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Someone needs to remind that guy that nobody is forcing him to tie flies. If he doesn't like it, let him find pleasure in something else, like maybe sitting in front of the TV and swilling beer.

He says tying flies is even more frustrating than playing golf. Heaven forbid that he should feel forced to do something challenging! Remember the quote in "A League of Their Own": "Of course it's hard. If it wasn't everyone could do it".

 

I'll let Mike chime in on the "requirement" to spend lots of money. I've said enough.

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I agree completely. I have manged to keep tying pretty inexpensive myself. Also I noticed that neither article mentioned the conviniece of tying your own flies. I can sit down tye a dozen flies when ever I want. No more having to stop and buy flies. Very easy.

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I will add something to this ... but not what you're expecting, Flafly.

 

I don't know if they were intended to be humorous stories or not, but that's the way I read them. There are various reasons people get into fly tying ... and like most fantasy hobbies or jobs, reality rarely matches fantasy.

Like people who think it'd be cool to be a guide, be on the water everyday, fishing and showing other's how to fish.

They go to classes, get a Captain's license ... pay to advertise. Then spend one day out of 20 actually fishing with someone who knows what they're doing. The other 19 days, they babysit, console, lie to people who suck but you can't tell them that if you want to earn a tip. They spend many of their days baiting hooks, because people would rather catch a big fish on a shiner (Like they "read in the magazine").

Fishing becomes a job, and not a fantasy lived out.

 

Yes, it is possible to tie on a budget and to save lots of money tying your own flies. But I will probably never have a display fly pretty enough to put in a shadow box for posterity.

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It all comes down to this: in terms of a hobby, what matters is whether you enjoy it. In terms of a job, not everyone has that choice.... for example, I can't think of anyone cleaning public restrooms for a hobby.

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i get out of stuff what i put into it. i love fishing my own flies, talk about a bit of "me" into the catching of the fish! though recently I've come to enjoy fishing the fly swap products, before swap i refused, even with guides, to fish anything but my own tied flies.

yes, it takes a lot of practice. like cooking, once you get it, you start inventing and getting creative. then the fun starts - what can i get the fish to take?

i had an early life catharsis with my father. i was maybe 11 or 12 i think. he lost his last fly. he went back to our camping trailer and got some of mom's black yarn (she knitted while he fished ...) and just knotted on a piece of yarn to a worm hook. he continued to catch fish.

i tried golf for years, and still enjoy playing, but quit for the most part because i could not get what i considered "good" at it after a few years, but it was too repetitive and the cost was more than i thought i was getting out of it.

on cost, i got back into tying 15 years ago after a 25 year hiatus. my entry point, after a few months getting up to speed on equipment and technique again, was to tie for a shop. i earned enough not only to pay for my equipment and material, but also to purchase my current array of fly rods and reels. other than for that i'm not at all sure i can tie in a cost-effective way - i enjoy the craft too much. it's zen for me.

oh, and of course there's the whole "good fly" thing. who says? my ties can be judged by the common wisdom of those who run fly shops, indulge the art, go to the shows ... i.e. by the historical standards of the sport of fly tying. or ... by the trout. which audience i'm concerned with actually sort of depends on my mood.

fly tying suits me.

 

oh, one last thing. i love the article. it is not a bad thing to wax journalistic when frustrated. wherever his journey leads him, then, be blessed!

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One of the reasons I tie is that at least 90% of the flies I use are not commercially available.

Not sure if this is a curse or blessing of being a warm water guy.

 

Rick

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To your point Rick that's why I started tying again. I was fishing the California surf a lot and found suggestions for ties you can not buy. So I started tying in order to try those flies out. The obssion spiraled from there.

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I can feel his pain, that is where I am at. But some of you have told me that even a not good looking fly will catch fish. M flys are sturdy and look like the sample but not pretty. I could never sell them. His problem is he is comparing his flys to one tied by experts not what will work. He also mentioned taking classes then he could teach his daughter. But he gets one thing out of it, time with his daughter. If she comes to enjoy tieing flys his struggles will have produced something

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One of the reasons I tie is that at least 90% of the flies I use are not commercially available.

Not sure if this is a curse or blessing of being a warm water guy.

 

Rick

That's exactly why I tie Rick - I like to play around with my own patterns

also !!!

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I read the article, and not sure if he was trying to be humorous or not, but if not, seems to me he's trying to do more than he's capable at this point.

 

Everyone who starts tying wants to be able to tie the flies they use most, but just like building a structure, you got to start with a sound foundation.

 

He needs to get him some personalized help, perhaps paying for some tying instruction if he's willing to go that route. I think I read in one of his comments he's near Harrisburg, PA. Heck, Bob Clousers' Fly Shop is not far from there. Who better to get instruction from?

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I wrote my article because it's an item that can be debated either way regarding saving money. I think that frustration at the desk is more a personality thing than anything. I'm kind of like that when I try to do something new (golf, racing rc cars, etc etc.) If I'm not moderately good at it, it frustrates me to continue so I stop...

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I think maybe he had unreal expectations as far as where his skill level would be two months in. I found his article to send kind of a discouraging message. Let me put it this way, if you had never tied a fly in your life and were considering beginning to tie, after reading this article would you still be interested? As far as the cost of tying, I agree with mike that you can tie on a budget and still tie flies that will catch fish.

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Possibly because it encourages people to buy flies from people like myself, I don't find it too negative. For someone to try for two months, without guidance I would expect 95% of people to end up in the same place. It does send out the message loud and clear that fly tying should be taught. If I was running a weekly class, with students who practised, I should expect them to be able to tie a fair range of flies of a usable standard in that time.

 

Yes many people approach it with unrealistic expectations. My very first tying course someone asked the instructor, on the first night, "What week will we be covering full dressed salmon flies?" A friend of mine often quotes a musical principal of putting in 10 000 hours of practice to master an instrument. Nothing you can buy will get you there unless you make that kind of commitment to learning. The famous quote from AK Best, that he doesn't really know how to tie a fly until he has tied 100 dozen reflects this.

 

Maybe as a group we are letting such people down. Perhaps we should be producing some kind of beginners skill set tutorial? I have thought of beginning this, but, especially with the way people use the quote button I dread to think what it would become if it was a "normal" thread. Of course, going back to the musical instrument analogy, if you want to learn an instrument, you would expect to pay for lessons. In fly tying it seems everyone expects this for free. That leads to the preponderance of videos, mostly bad ones, that people follow to try to learn. (I've even seen examples on here of videos that differ between the words and actions. "Take 3 or 4 turns" then the person in the video takes 12. None were necessary.) For these and other reasons I have shied away from beginning this task.

 

It is still an indictment against the community of fly tiers that we let someone get into this position. Steve Smith has put his feelings into words, but how many have just given up silently?

 

Cheers,

C.

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