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When I use UV glue, it looks whitish blue, and kind of cloudy when under the UV light!  It looks just fine under normal light!  Does any one know, what it looks like to the fish?  I like the UV glue, but I don"t want to use it, if it totally changes what the fish sees.  What do you guys think?

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The glue itself only appears bluish under the lamp, I have never seen it give off any ultra violet glow underwater.  The name refers to the curing agent (ultra violet light,) which is found in all sunlight.  For a morey professional answer, you would have to ask a fish.

 

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pop-er-pa

Welcome to the site, that's is a excellent question. I do not have an answer to it directly but I have used UV for salt water and some fresh water fly patterns without fish shying away. If it has UV properties as some materials it may make it more visible to fish. Good question for SilverCreek. 

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16 hours ago, pop-er-pa said:

When I use UV glue, it looks whitish blue, and kind of cloudy when under the UV light!  It looks just fine under normal light!  Does any one know, what it looks like to the fish?  I like the UV glue, but I don"t want to use it, if it totally changes what the fish sees.  What do you guys think?

The way trout vision is measure is by examining the retina of trout. Form leads to function.

They have rods and cones just like humans have rods and cones. Adult trout have 3 types of cones and they are centered on about the same color frequencies as human cones. If they were not, we could not actually match the color of the food they see. In other words, if we matched the color of a blue winged olive fly with dubbing, the only way we could match the color the trout see is if the cones of the trout were centered at the same color frequencies that humans see.

Human blue cone is centered on 437 λ, trout is 434 λ. Human red cone is centered on 533 λ, trout is 531 λ. Human green cone is centered on 564 λ and trout is 576 λ. There is excellent correspondence between the color hues that a human sees and a trout trout sees.

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Similarly, the density of the cones in the retina determine the detail that trout can see. Humans have a macula for detail vision that has 14 times the density of cones that trout have so we see 14 times the detail that trout see. That is why we can fool them with patterns that "simulate" the natural and are not exact duplicates of the natural. Even when trout are extremely selective, they can be fooled because the see detail poorly BUT the lack of detail does NOT affect the ability to see motion. 

Cone and rod density does not affect the ability to see whether there is motion or not. So they see drag very well and when they are closer to the fly that we are, they can see "micro" drag that we cannot see from farther off.

So trout essentially "see" the shape and colors that we see but we see it in greater detail.

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This is so cool, and exactly what I wanted to know.  Is it safe to assume that trout ( which see colors amazingly simular to the way we see them), see colors simular to the way other fish see them?  Specificly, do bluegill, smallmouth bass, and pike have color reception simular to trout, and therefore, us?

Thanks 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The real point is do they care ? To find that out go fishing with your flies. If your flies get fish then it seems you win.

 

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14 hours ago, pop-er-pa said:

This is so cool, and exactly what I wanted to know.  Is it safe to assume that trout ( which see colors amazingly simular to the way we see them), see colors simular to the way other fish see them?  Specificly, do bluegill, smallmouth bass, and pike have color reception simular to trout, and therefore, us?

Thanks 

I have not looked into other fish.

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4 hours ago, Dave G. said:

The real point is do they care ? To find that out go fishing with your flies. If your flies get fish then it seems you win.

 

With all due respect, yes they do. If fish had no lateral lines to feel vibrations, wounded minnow patterns would not attract them.

The more we know about our prey, the better we will be at catching them. That is why we use imitative patterns during a hatch. If fish did NOT care, all we would need is one pattern in one size.

The fact that you carry multiple patterns in several sizes is proof that you realize that fish "care".

QED.

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12 minutes ago, SilverCreek said:

QED

This marks the first time I have seen this used outside of the LA Times Crossword. 

 

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22 hours ago, SilverCreek said:

So trout essentially "see" the shape and colors that we see but we see it in greater detail.

so they see a clear blob of uv resin that may be used as a coating for a fly head or wing case or for heads on large streamers?

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Yes but not in detail.

There are 3 major things to remember about trout vision. compared to our vision,

1. They see ONLY 1/14 the detail we see because we have 14 times the density of cones and rods in the macula of our retina. Trout do not have a macula for fine vision. This lack of fine detail is the major reason our flies can fool trout.

So to see more detail, they have to get CLOSER to the object. That is why we get "late refusals" to our dry flies. They have to get close to notice details including microdrag.

2. They have a round lens that CAN NOT change shape like the human lenses. So everything underwater is in focus for trout from 2' to infinity. To focus on objects closer than 2 feet, the are able to bring their round lens closer to their retina so they can focus on close objects.

3. They see the colors we see with minimal differences. The 3 types of color receptors in their retina have sensitivity peaks very close to our 3 types of color receptors.

This previous thread has a discussion on trout vision.

 

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23 hours ago, pop-er-pa said:

This is so cool, and exactly what I wanted to know.  Is it safe to assume that trout ( which see colors amazingly similar to the way we see them), see colors similar to the way other fish see them?  Specifically, do bluegill, smallmouth bass, and pike have color reception similar to trout, and therefore, us?

Thanks 

I did a bit of googleing .  Very little, if any research has been done on what colors panfish.  More has been done for bass.  They see bright colors but white and chartreuse look the same to them.  They see reds and greens.  They see dark colors, but blue, purple, brown and black look the same to them.  Northern Pike have vision similar to trout and humans.  They like bright colors, white, chartreuse and bright orange and flash.

As far as panfish go.  I've had good luck with white and yellow top water bugs.  White and chartreuse subsurface.  Generally, white, yellow and chartreuse catch me a lot of Panfish, Bass(largemouth and smallmouth), Northern Pike and Chain Pickerel.

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