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LOL, I agree with you Squatch. 

Although, I do have a few mop flies I've tied, but only use them for panfish.  With two daughters and  thousands of those things around the house, next time I'll probably throw one on my tying desk instead of throwing it away.   

I didn't listen to the audio, so he may have mentioned this, but I believe those things are all synthetic, and so will probably be a little lighter than the mop material, as they won't absorb/retain as much water. 

@shoebop, thanks for posting this. 

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Don't worry Squatch!  There are 10's of thousands of other FLY patterns out there for people to tie and fish with!!!  This pattern will go the way of the micro-miniskirt! Oh, wait....hmmm.

Kim

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I didn't listen to the audio, either.  But I do like the way that stuff stretches.  

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I had the same inspiration a couple of years ago.  Picked up a pack at the $1 Store and tied up a couple of flies.  Didn't have any luck with them.  I used the yellow and the green ones.  They're stiffer than mop pieces and don't have the same movement as a similar size mop piece.  Still they've got nice segmentation,   Coloring them black or olive with permanent markers would make a nice leech pattern,  I'll have to really stretch them and see if I can get more length and more movement from the longer pieces

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Okay, here's a tip about mop flies I learned through the guy who gave me a bunch of mops and mega worm yarn awhile back. Turn your mop glove inside out, cut one of the strands and start pulling it out. You have to pull the mop strands sticking through fairly hard but this gives you a strand as long as you want of curly single strand mop fly yarn. I used it to make some egg flies and mega worms and it looks good. Not hard to do once you pull hard enough to pull the out mop section through the little hole it goes through.

 

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I do that when I want longer pieces to use as streamers.   It can be a pain getting them out.  I have a narrow nail driven into my tying desk.  Just loop it over the nail and twist it back into a long mop piece.  If I want a thicker mop piece, I'll put two strands over the nail, and twist them together.  I'll do this for bass streamers.  I've also been playing with the mop chenille, but it's not quite the same as a mop piece.   Still it's easy to make a light weight streamer that's five or six inches long.

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11 hours ago, vicrider said:

 Turn your mop glove inside out, cut one of the strands and start pulling it out. You have to pull the mop strands sticking through fairly hard but this gives you a strand as long as you want of curly single strand mop fly yarn. 

Thanx, man!👊

I did not know this and just assumed they were mostly a clip-off source.  They're actually one piece, continuous twist/pull-throughs and can be used several ways.  Here's an autopsy pic of my gray & green...

moppy.jpg.1974de293f786662b9536e0668ccdf71.jpg

This does give more options for working up the shank after tail tie-in or perhaps even incorporating the remaining section of material in a brushy dubbing loop.  

 

Edited by knotjoe
dunning dubbing autocorrect

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