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Fly Fishing in Texas Summer Heat

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I was able to make it out and fish with Paul for a few hours. We got there very early and fished until it was just too hot. Which was around 12. In fact Paul left around 11, and I continued to fish for another hour until I just couldn't anymore. The fishing was good, and I was able to get a couple Rio's and bass, but mostly it was sunfish for me. Which is usual on this river. Seems like I always and getting the sunnies, but rarely get any decent bass.

 

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Nice video as always.  Like the exotics.  Amazing no crowds just a cowboy.   I’ll bet tha Guad would be great wet wading early.  That is before the  kayak/float tubers hatch👍   Here’s a pic at the launch/truck park years ago on the SpringRiver, Ark. when we returned from our morning jaunt😳. Good thing there are other opportunities upstream of this chaos.

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Commercial rafters and kayakers take over the Hiwassee River here in east Tennessee from 11AM to dark. This is when TVA turns on their two generators for water flow. I call it the Michelin hatch. They get a kickback for each commercial rafter so they make money off the river. BTW, it generates a sackful of tourist money for the area.

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When it's too hot and the water temps are too hot also, I give the trout a break and go hiking instead.  The trout hate the heat just like we do.

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Trout start to stress when water temps are at or over 68 degrees. Here, it is stop fishing and go to higher elevations to fish. The TWRA will monitor water temps in August and September. If it's too hot, they don't stock as it will result in a high mortality rate. My home river, Hiwassee River, is a prime example.

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12 hours ago, DrLogik said:

When it's too hot and the water temps are too hot also, I give the trout a break and go hiking instead.  The trout hate the heat just like we do.

Yeah, there aren’t really great trout fishing in Texas.  In the winter the Guadalupe does well but it’s mostly stocked fish.  

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Trout, the only invasive species that is routinely re-introduced.   

From the  US Forest Service Research & Development

"Considerable published information now exists to demonstrate that non-native trout have caused altered aquatic ecosystems and displaced native species."

Not only do I think the sunfish family are prettier than trout, but I can find them everywhere.  No need to worry if they're "stressed" or stocked, etc.

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If they are stocking trout in a warm water creek the mortality rate is 100%. At least that’s what it is in PA where they stock my local WW creek with trout even though there is no year round trout population nor could there ever be because of water temp. We call it a put and take fishery. They put and people take the trout when caught or the trout die. If the creek is a spring fed heavily wooded creek it probably does maintain a cool temp year round where stocked trout could hold over from year to year and only be stressed during a month of extremely high mid afternoon water temps. 
 

I don’t fish in the dog days of summer because I can’t stand the heat so I know how a trout feels. 

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Youse guys prolly never have supported Trout Unlimited...Tailwater trouting in a lotta pkaces created some amazing fisheries; albeit invasive species....

http://grtu.org/about/

The one that comes to mind from the many White River systems in Arkansas is the LittleRed River that had the 40 lb world record Brown for years,,,,

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Here in East Tennessee, rainbow trout and brown trout are not invasive as other species we see in the news. They were deliberately introduced into local waters. The rainbows were introduced into the mountains to replace the tragic loss of the Apalachian strain brook trout. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, the brook trout population was decimated by the cutting of the forests, leading to heavy silting and rising water temperatures. The brookies or specs, as they are known locally, require the coldest and cleanest water of the cold water fishes. Catching them is an adventure, fishing in breathtaking scenery, catching a holdover from centuries gone by. There is a campaign to stock brookies back in their traditional waters. I helped shock about 900 rainbows out of one stream in the Tellico corridor to allow reintroduction of brookies. Want to take my grandson there this year. I was a part of a group that renovated the old brook trout hatchery at the Pheasant Fields Hatchery, run by the TWRA. It has been so successful, I understand that this endeavor is being or, has been, duplicated by the Erwin, TN hatchery.

BTW, been a TU member for about 28 years and held local and state offices.

East Tennessee hosts some of the best tailwater fisheries in the Southeast- South Holston, Clinch, Watauga, Hiwassee. They are stocked and holdovers can grow to big sizes. Look at the record fish for Tennessee on the TWRA website for fishing regulations, pages 44-46.

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Correct me if I’m wrong but I thought carry over stocker fish start to get a square tail or lots cleaner tails the longer they survive and loose the “stocker look.”  Not sure of stocking size either.   Saw somewhere TheGuadaloupe was listed as a top 10 trout stream.   Propaganda?  I learned one thing they wanted little stuff to be dumb stockers....

https://www.lonestarflyfishing.com/blog/2019/11/14/guadalupe-river-fishing-report-fall-2019

http://livingwatersflyfishing.com/guadalupe-river/

 

 

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Never heard the tale of the "tails." Those look like Tenkara flies.

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Those look like Tenkaraflies.   That’s funny!🙄

Bout like my Tenkara steamer...   🤪

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Here in PA they stock warm water fisheries with cold water fish (trout). They can only live a month or two before the water temps kill them.  Personally I don’t understand why they don’t stock WW fish in WW creeks. Pa has no shortage of wild trout streams. The state also stock some of these with hatchery fish to the great chagrin of trout fisherman who do not want stockers introduced to their waters. 

TU does a great job of stream restoration to allow trout to live where they once did but they do not stock trout in WW fisheries. I read Dendukes link about stocking trout in what once was a WW fisheries but is now a CW fisheries because of a dam and dam release. This makes sense. My post was about my states efforts of stocking trout where they cannot live or where do not have to. Glad to hear other states do not share in PA’s idiocy. 

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