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SalarMan

Traherne's Wonder

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Thanks for your follow-up to my earlier attempt to explain the why and how of classic salmon flies today.

As far as time and money...that is oh so true...but that is that really any different than the hunt and time and money for fly tying in general?😄

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It is most definitely a labor of love! Even when I was learning to tie my own flies the mentors told me it was surely not a money saving effort. Boy, were they right!

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On 12/6/2021 at 3:25 AM, agn54 said:

Thanks for the history behind these. I find them incredibly beautiful works of art. As for fishing, I’ve always wondered what are they supposed to emulate? Butterflies, or just something that looks like “food” like some attractor patterns?

Hi guys, interesting thread...wanted to bump it. These flies, like most flies for andromadous fish, are not designed to emulate food. These fish, salmon and winter steelhead, don't eat much at all after entering fresh water. They have one thing in mind, making babies. Imagine how much a 50 lb salmon would have to eat!!! These guys aren't hungery, they're territorial and have a "personal space" that they like to maintain. If you see salmon breaching in a deeper pool, they likely bumped into another fish and pissed 'em off. When something big and colorful swings into their "bubble" they lash out at it with their mouth (their only weapon). This is why you see big, nasty modern flies like the "Intruder" style, doesn't look like food at all but man does it piss 'em right off!!! And, as with most things, it becomes a bit of a friendly competition to see who can make the prettiest, most eye catching and elaborate works of art. As it has been said, a steelhead or salmon would eat your car key if presented correctly. The flies are for us, not them.

Cheers

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On 9/7/2022 at 1:04 PM, hopperfisher said:

Hi guys, interesting thread...wanted to bump it. These flies, like most flies for andromadous fish, are not designed to emulate food. These fish, salmon and winter steelhead, don't eat much at all after entering fresh water. They have one thing in mind, making babies. Imagine how much a 50 lb salmon would have to eat!!! These guys aren't hungery, they're territorial and have a "personal space" that they like to maintain. If you see salmon breaching in a deeper pool, they likely bumped into another fish and pissed 'em off. When something big and colorful swings into their "bubble" they lash out at it with their mouth (their only weapon). This is why you see big, nasty modern flies like the "Intruder" style, doesn't look like food at all but man does it piss 'em right off!!! And, as with most things, it becomes a bit of a friendly competition to see who can make the prettiest, most eye catching and elaborate works of art. As it has been said, a steelhead or salmon would eat your car key if presented correctly. The flies are for us, not them.

Cheers

Awesome info, thanks a lot. Reminds of me of fishing for peacock bass when they spawn. They hit anything that passes and will often keep hitting on subsequent casts if they miss the hook  

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I've fished peacocks myself...it'd be awesome if steelies were that aggressive!!! They might have been back in the day...and maybe now too, but there's one fish where there used to be a hundred...that's why we try so hard

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