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I am part of a small group...4 of us...who get together to tie classic salmon flies on a semi regular basis...and with whom I am sort of the teacher and mentor due to my much longer time tying these wonderful types of flies.

January is when we will meet next and the guys have picked the Popham as the pattern of choice. I haven't tied one in a spell so I figured it wouldn't hurt to refresh myself with all that is involved..

As usual the fly doesn't have it final preening at this point. I prefer to use not just my eyes on the fly, but the photo that always brings out the flaws to be  cleaned up.

 

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Beautiful tie!  I would appreciate seeing a picture of the finished fly. I am wondering if I can see any differences. I really look forward to seeing your posts. 
Tom

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Tom,

Sorry for the delay...couldn't access the site all day yesterday.

Attached is a photo of the finished fly. The horns are now where they belong; a couple of wraps of tinsel nudged a bit; the wing curve brought into place allowing the tip of it and the topping to come together with the tail; stray fibers in the veilings cleaned up a bit; uncooperative throat fibers either fixed or eliminated. You get the idea...just tiny little things that to my eye make a difference. The head still needs another coat of cement. Other than that the fly is pretty much done.

Thanks for looking, your curiosity and kind words,

George

 

DSC_0001 (8).JPG

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For me at least...they are strictly for display. During my Atlantic Salmon fishing prime I fished classics, both my own ties as well as commercial ties. They were all on eyed hooks, never with gut eyes...although there are those who fish them with the gut eyes.

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Just wondering, because a lot of Salmon and Steelhead flies now, are much more simplified and definitely not as pretty. Thanks for the info. 

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I've always fished a classic from time to time just out of a sense of tradition, and I have taken Atlantic Salmon on them. On one particular trip a good number of years ago, every fish taken by me during that week on the now closed Tobique River in New Brunswick was taken on a classic pattern. My partner insisting the fly was not the factor, stuck with the usual array of hairwings and never rose a fish. Go figure.

That being said, the usual selection of hairwings will generally out perform the classics by far over the long term. At least that has been my experience.

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Amazing Fly, can you share some locations that you have fished For Atlantic's? I am hoping

to get an opportunity this year.

Mike

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Mike,

First...I made my first trip for Atlantic Salmon in 1974, and I haven't been back since 2014. During those years I fished primarily in Quebec, with 2 trips to New Brunswick and several to Nova Scotia as well as Maine. The list of rivers is as follows - Quebec: Matane, Piashti, Petite Watshishou, Petite Cascapedia, Grande River, York, Dartmouth. St. Jean & Pabos West - Nova Scotia: The Margaree of course - New Brunswick: The Tobique (now closed) - Maine: The Narraguagus (also now closed). The sad part for me personally is that I never fished the Miramichi system in New Brunswick. Just didn't get around to it🙁

Should you decide to make the trip north I strongly recommend using the internet to gather info on outfitters, lodges and in many cases whether or not any particular river has some if any public access with the exception of Nova Scotia where all of the rivers are public. In New Brunswick guides are required by law for non-residents, or that is the way it was in the past.

Finally...Nova Scotia is the most reasonable choice for costs. Otherwise be prepared to open your wallet because to be blunt it has become rather expensive in most cases. My last trip to Gaspe averaged out to $900 per day, including tip for my guide, travel expenses, meals, etc. However you can fish that area on a budget if you are a camper and stick to the public sectors on the Dartmouth and York rivers. Want a outfitter? I used Quebec Sporting, and found the owner Ann Smith to be super. Go to www.saumonquebec.com for info on the rivers in the area and be sure to click in the box for English unless you are fluent in French.

Oh yea - If you are serious about this  start planning and making reservations NOW!!!

I guess that's about it and I hope this helps.

Good Luck,
George

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Thank you so much for all of this useful information. Sorry for Hijacking

the post.

Mike

 

 

.

 

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