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RexW

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About RexW

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    Warmwater
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    2007

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  1. Personally, I am enjoying the comments and discussions. There are several people here like me that are learning this style of tying and the comments here have been way kinder and more helpful than I have seen on some other locations. No way would I ever post a fly on some of them. I am enjoying the beginner posts and comments.
  2. I had missed this thread before today. Wow, there is a lot of good advice in here. Thanks for the help.
  3. Thanks for the kind comments everyone.
  4. Kelson's Black Dog with a lot of substitutions and a lot of mistakes. A major mistake about half way through resulted in crowding the eye and I had to skip the wood duck in the wing as a result, but this is the most complex pattern that I've attempted so far and I'm still proud of it. Warts and all. Tag: Silver tinsel and yellow silk Tail: GP topping and red goose Butt: Black ostrich Rib: Yellow silk with oval silver tinsel on each side Body: Black silk and black hackle Throat: Same hackle as body Wing: Underwing of red-orange hackle, Jungle fowl, then two shades of turkey (sub'ed for bustard and pheasant), red and yellow goose, and a GP topping. Note: I skipped the wood duck in the wing due to I just ran out of space.
  5. Kelson's Black Dog with a lot of substitutions and a lot of mistakes. A major mistake about half way through resulted in crowding the eye and I had to skip the wood duck in the wing as a result, but this is the most complex pattern that I've attempted so far and I'm still proud of it. Warts and all. Tag: Silver tinsel and yellow silk Tail: GP topping and red goose Butt: Black ostrich Rib: Yellow silk with oval silver tinsel on each side Body: Black silk and black hackle Throat: Same hackle as body Wing: Underwing of red-orange hackle, Jungle fowl, then two shades of turkey (sub'ed for bustard and pheasant), red and yellow goose, and a GP topping
  6. Thanksgiving is done. So, it's time to hang the Christmas tree.
  7. Living Waters Fly shop recently posted a nameless bass fly that was tied with the goal of putting as much motion as possible in the pattern. Other than the hackles, I have no idea how they tied their fly, but here's my (rather poor in comparison) attempt to copy the pattern. It looks kind of ugly, but I think this will be a very effective bass fly. Not much to the recipe. The tail and the collar are both tied with Medium Pardo Coq de Leon hackles and Grey Heron Whiting Spey hackles. Fly Tier Dungeon's Kraken Dubbing in Silver Minnow was used for the body with some lead on the shank for weight.
  8. Also, he lists the alternatives as: Daiichi 1730, Dai-Riki 700-B, Gamakatsu C11-5L2H, and Kamasan B810 Good luck!
  9. Based on Schmidt's "Hooks for the Fly", it appears to be a Mustad model 81002BR.
  10. As I recall, that line was basically an integrated shooting head design. I would look at the 10 wt versions of Rio's Outbound Short, Orvis's Bank Shot, or similar line tapers from other manufacturers.
  11. I still like and use books, but the web can be useful too. Unlike Mike, I tie a variety of patterns and I find it much easier to use a book to search for interesting patterns to tie. I also find books to be quicker if I am trying to remember a recipe or what order to tie the materials for a pattern. I do like the web to learn new techniques. My biggest complaint is there are a lot of poor quality fly tiers out there that have posted videos that are a waste of time to watch. I usually find it quicker to just grab a book than to search for a quality video. I am no where near as organized as Flytire, but here are some of the books that I have available. However, for anyone new to fly tying. the web is wonderful. If it had been available when I started, my learning curve would have been shortened significantly and I probably would not own this many books. I'm also a casting instructor which explains all the casting books. I have found books to be an invaluable reference for an instructor because I can compare how different people have explained different concepts and techniques. I shamelessly steal and use as many good ideas as I can. Good "technical" style explanations are seldom available in online casting videos. On a side note the two books on their side in the first photo are good ones. "Fly-Casting Finesse" by Fields, is an excellent reference for anyone considering the FFI casting instructor certification exam. "The Complete Illustrated Directory of Salmon & Steelhead Flies" by Mann is a great collection of fly pattern recipes and includes many that I can't find on the internet. OK, I realize these are a couple of specialized areas, but if you are interested in them, these books are good ones on the topics.
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