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Fly Tying

flytire

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About flytire

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 09/19/1952

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    trout
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  • Website URL
    http://flytyingnewandold.blogspot.com/

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    Norwich, CT

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  1. Gibby's Myakka Minnow (Steve Gibson) Hook - Mustad S82-3906B (or equivalent), size 8 Thread - Fine mono or white Tail - Clipped marabou Weight - 6-8 turns of .020 lead/non lead wire Body - Bodi-Braid Eyes - Stick-On Coating - UV Resin or Devcon 2-Ton Epoxy. Overcoat with clear nail polish if desired Note - Color options are up to the individual tyer.
  2. were are you tying in the fibers at? the very tip? tying in the tips are going to break cut off about 1/4 inch from the tip to get into much heavier fiber. tie in the fibers on top of the hook. then make a wrap away from you (or towards you if you prefer that direction) and then twists the fibers and wrap forward this helps with wrapping peacock herls as well
  3. got my flies and surprises yesterday cool piece of yarn/chenille thanks to all
  4. Bird of Prey – October Caddis Hook – Mustad C49S - #8-16 Weight - Gold Bead Thread - Black Tail – Hungarian partridge Ribbing - Pearl Flashabou Body – Orange/Burnt Orange dubbing Hackle – Hungarian partridge Head - Peacock Herl Bird of Prey - Tan Hook – Mustad C49S - #8-16 Weight - Gold Bead Thread - Black Tail – Hungarian partridge Ribbing - Pearl Flashabou Body – Tan/Light Cahill dubbing Hackle – Hungarian partridge Head - Peacock Herl Bird of Prey – Brown Hook – Mustad C49S - #8-16 Weight - Gold Bead Thread – Black Tail – Hungarian partridge Ribbing - Pearl Flashabou Body – Brown dubbing Hackle – Hungarian partridge Head - Peacock Herl Bird of Prey – Olive Hook – Mustad C49S - #8-16 Weight - Gold Bead Thread - Black Tail – Hungarian partridge Ribbing - Pearl Flashabou Body – Olive dubbing Hackle – Hungarian partridge Head - Peacock Herl Bird of Prey – Black Hook – Mustad C49S - #8-16 Weight - Gold Bead Thread - Black Tail – Hungarian partridge Ribbing - Pearl Flashabou Body – Black dubbing Hackle – Hungarian partridge Head - Peacock Herl Designed by Rick Anderson. This fly has become a popular caddis pupa/emerger pattern.
  5. you can use all 3 sizes for a size 8 hook i would use small or medium
  6. they are actually atlantic salmon flies but could be used for trout ive already shared my camera settings on the forum Full Fly In Focus - Photography Corner - Fly Tying (flytyingforum.com)
  7. Any way to make this more durable... or a suggestion to equally sparkly ribbing that is more durable? try using silver or gold wire instead of flat tinsel or use oval tinsel with tight wraps counter wrap over the tinsel with wire was thinking perhaps of using gold crystal flash krystal flash is still tinsel so it might break as well it could also be the way you're gripping the fly to remove it from the fishes mouth the ribbing looks fine in that fishes mouth
  8. i have dyed pheasant tails and have no problems wrapping the the fibers if you want ginger/tan fibers try using the hen feathers or golden pheasant tails
  9. Black Bear Hook - Gamakatsu T10-6H Thread - Black Tag - Oval silver tinsel Tail - Black hackle fibers Ribbing - Oval silver tinsel Body - Black floss or uni stretch Wing - Black bear hair Throat - Black hackle fibers Black Bear Green Butt Hook - Gamakatsu T10-6H Thread - Black Tag - Oval silver tinsel Butt - Green uni stretch Tail - Black hackle fibers Ribbing - Oval silver tinsel Body - Black uni stretch Wing - Black bear or substitute Throat - Black hackle fibers Black Bear Orange Butt Hook - Gamakatsu T10-6H Thread - Black Tag - Oval silver tinsel Butt - Orange uni stretch Tail - Black hackle fibers Ribbing - Oval silver tinsel Body - Black uni stretch Wing - Black bear Throat - Black hackle fibers Black Bear Red Butt Hook - Gamakatsu T10-6H Thread - Black Tag - Oval silver tinsel Butt - Red uni stretch Tail - Black hackle fibers Ribbing - Oval silver tinsel Body - Black uni stretch Wing - Black bear or substitute Throat - Black hackle fibers Atlantic Salmon Flies - Jacques Heroux
  10. looks to be very usable hides if fly shop hides are better i'll take them off your hands πŸ˜„πŸ‘
  11. "I looked at the dry flies available at the time and found that they were always slim-bodied and sparsely hackled. They were made only of feathers, and they were hard to keep afloat. If a fish were caught on one of them, the fly had to be retired to dry a while before it would float again. I wanted a buggier-looking, heavier-bodied fly, and I needed more flotation in order to keep it up. I had in mind the big gray drakes that came out on the Ausable, which were heavier in the body than any of the dry-fly imitations of the day. Looking for a material that would float such a body, I came up with bucktail. The tail of the fly was most important since it would support the bend of the hook, where most of the weight is concentrated. Bucktail would make a much better tailing material than the conventional feather fibers because of its floating qualities and its strength. The flotation of the old flies was mostly at the front, and the usual wisps of feather fibers wouldnοΏ½t make a strong, floating tail. For example, the few golden-pheasant tippet-feather fibers of a Royal Coachman tail certainly didnοΏ½t have enough strength to hold the hook bend up for very long. Out of this thinking came the Gray WuIff, White Wulff and Royal Wulff. My use of bucktail was the first use of animal hair on dry flies. The Royal WuIff made the old, difficult-to-float, but beautiful, Royal Coachman pattern into a hell of a fly. The White Wulff was tied to imitate the coffin mayfly. I tied it both conventionally and with spent wings and no hackle to match the flies of the spinner fall - when the mayflies, spent with mating, fall to the water with wings outspread. Had I been brighter I would have patented the use of animal hair on dry flies and made some money, but I feel lucky that through these flies my name achieved a permanent place in fly-fishing. The Gray Wulff has brown bucktail wings and tail, blue-gray hackles and a gray angora yarn (spun rabbitοΏ½s fur) body. The White Wulff has white bucktail wings and tail, badger hackles and cream-colored angora for the body. The Royal Wulff has white bucktail wings, brown bucktail tail, dark brown hackles and a body of red silk floss between two segments of wound peacock hen. Dan Bailey, a close friend and one of my early fishing companions, insisted that I call the Gray Wulff by its present name instead of the Ausable Gray as I had thought to call it. It was Dan, who was beginning to tie and sell flies at that time, who sat down with me while we worked out the other patterns of the series to cover the field of trout-stream insects in general. The Grizzly Wulff, the Black Wulff, the Brown Wulff and the Blonde Wulff came out of those sessions. from Lee Wulff on Flies by Lee Wulff, 1980
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