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Fly Tying

perchjerker

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About perchjerker

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 11/05/1936

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  • Location
    Katy, Texas (Houston is our biggest suburb)
  1. Now we all know who has the 'short fuse'. Perhaps you should practice what you preach, Mr. Administrator!!! Me thinks the pot just called the kettle black!
  2. flytire has it "dead on" in both posts. And it has nothing to do with tying Right or Left handed. One can apply as much tension to the thread by pulling it towards the body as they can pulling it away.
  3. Matarelli. Been using them for over 30 years with no problems. Unless you tie commercially, there is no need to worry abut the thread "cutting a groove" in the end of the SS tube. Not certain that this is even a concern for the commercial tier! Ceramics are nice, but for the 'casual' tier, are a waste of money IMHO. (Yes, I have some.)
  4. Steve... I do not understand your inference about 'tone', as all I have done is give a straightforward rebuttal to your posts. At any rate, I rest my case in facts; not opinion. Frank
  5. Cream... Thanks, but I still have not seen any of his work! I have seen pictures before. Pictures do not compare to actually seeing the bug itself; at least for me; and I have had Mike's works in my 'hot little hand'. Cheers! Frank
  6. I have not actually seen any of Cohen's work, so can't make an honest comparison. I have watched Mike tie on four occasions, and have had him give me some personal instruction on how he does some of the things he does. I hope to see him again this Saturday, Feb 2. My comment was not made with the intent of comparing one o's work with that of another. Just a simple statement. Cheers! Frank
  7. That makes no sense perchjerker. Steeldrifter... This response makes me wonder if you truly understand what a level lines is, and what a double taper line is; in spite of the fact that I know that you do! Your 'analogy' with a tapered leader is so far off course as to be meaningless. The rest of your response is not germane to the subject. For a refresher: A level line is of uniform diameter for it's entire length. A double taper line has a short taper on each end, with the bulk of the line being of uniform diameter for the bulk of it's length; ergo, it is nothing more than a level line with a short taper on each end. I fail to see why this "...makes no sense...". Does this not make sense now? Or was your response an "OOOOPS"? Peace, Frank Frank I have been fly fishing for 25 yrs and build rods for my main source of living, I believe I have a very good understanding of fly lines thank you very much. As I said previous, I'm not gonna argue with someone I don't even know over the internet. You have your opinions, I have mine, simple as that. Take care. Steve Steve... I regret that you did NOT pick up on my note that I am aware of your knowledge of fly lines, giving credit where credit is due, and thus, seem to take my comment personally. As I bought my first fly rod in 1952, possibly long before you were born, I will leave the math to you to figure out how long I have been fly fishing; which, quite frankly, as well as your experience at building rods, has nothing to do with the 'facts' of my statement about a DT line being nothing more than a level line with a taper on each end. No argument, just a debate!! Cheers! Frank
  8. For those who want to use a Dremel to drive your dubbing brush maker and find that it turns too fast; as the motor has brushes in it, you can operate it through a rheostat to slow it down to a complete stop. A standard light dimmer switch is a rheostat, and works great for just such application. Here is a pic of what I cobbled together a few years back for just such purposes.
  9. The ubiquitous English sparrow is also known as the "house sparrow'. They are NOT protected. However, as noted, there are numerous species; and many do very closely resemble the House, or English sparrow. Most of them, fortunately, do not typically inhabit residential areas.
  10. Forgot to mention all of the various length and line weight graphite Fenwicks I also have. They too are great rods!
  11. I don't see how it follows that the lower mass fly line goes farther. If the caster puts the same amount of energy (Kinetic Energy KE) into both, the lighter line must go faster to have the same energy as the heaver and therefore slower line. However, this does not mean that it goes farther. The distance the line travels can be found by this formula right out of a basic physics book: distance = KE / average resisting force If both have the same KE and the same average resisting force, the distance will be identical. But will they have the same resisting force? The level line has a larger diameter at it's end than the DT line so that adds air resistance, slows the line and therefore decreases distance. The faster line has it's disadvantage too. Drag on an object through a fluid (air) increases at the SQUARE of velocity. So a small increase in velocity means a big increase in drag (resisting force) and therefore a decrease in distance. Which would go farther? You would just have to cast them and see. Also, different lines, weights, manufacturers, etc. may give different results. Sorry for the boring physics lesson. I just couldn't help myself. heavynets.. You are definitely correct; but, you addressed something entirely different from what steeldrifter actually said. He is talking about loss of energy along the line as the cast unfurls as related to the diameter of that line. It stands to reason that as A line gets smaller in diameter, it loses capacity to transmit energy. If this were not true, every dry fly ever cast would hit the water like an anvil. Also, this is why electrical transmission lines get larger, or smaller, as the imparted voltage to be 'transported' goes up or down.
  12. Yes and Yes! I even occasionally use my old Fenwick "glass" rod, and truly enjoy it's slow action for throwing large hairy bass bugs!
  13. BTA is absolutely correct! House sparrows, feral pigeons and starlings, with a few other 'oddball' species are NOT protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). Therefore, you can "take" and "Use" as you see fit. The only possible exc3ption would be if you live in a community that prohibits the discharge of a gun of any type, including BB guns, inside the corporate limits. If there is such a prohibition, simply trap them!
  14. Also look for Pantone, as they have an unbelievable range of colors, and they are permanent.
  15. That makes no sense perchjerker. Steeldrifter... This response makes me wonder if you truly understand what a level lines is, and what a double taper line is; in spite of the fact that I know that you do! Your 'analogy' with a tapered leader is so far off course as to be meaningless. The rest of your response is not germane to the subject. For a refresher: A level line is of uniform diameter for it's entire length. A double taper line has a short taper on each end, with the bulk of the line being of uniform diameter for the bulk of it's length; ergo, it is nothing more than a level line with a short taper on each end. I fail to see why this "...makes no sense...". Does this not make sense now? Or was your response an "OOOOPS"? Peace, Frank
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