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Found 20 results

  1. The Zug bug is a fly that works really well, however it doesn't seem to resemble any particular bug specifically. Not sure really what it is supposed to mimmic. Some say caddis (cased or pupa), and while that could be, it really isn't a good representation. However, that means nothing in fishing. Something doesn't have to look identical to a forage for a fish to eat it. And trout love this fly. I find especially in the winter time for some reason. Although I have had them take this fly year round. The fly is also relatively easy to tie compared to some other flashy patterns like copper johns or prince nymphs (both of which also don't mimic anything specific, but trout love them!). As always I am listing all the materials used on this fly below. Hook: Firehole Sticks #609 in size 14 Thread: Veevus 6/0 in Black Tail: Peacock Swords Ribbing: Silver Tinsel Body: Peacock Hurl Hackle: Hen neck or saddle Wing Case: Natural Mallard Flank Head Cement: Original Hard as Hull
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChzzREo0ocU I've just received my order of the Firehole stones and had the idea to make the olive beads into an olive with a little bit of red painted added.
  3. This fly was originally created by Lance Egan, and is one of the best attractor patterns Ive ever fished. It's flashy, bright, and effective. I love fishing this as my lead fly, then drop to something a bit more realistic behind it. My favorite flies to drop behind this are the RS2, Pheasant tail, or black beauty. All of which can mimic midge or Baetis pupa and emergers quite well. So this fly can also be tied with a glass bead, and I believe originally it was created this way. However I like using brass beads here because it gives the fly a bit more weight, and I really like using this as my lead fly, to help other flies sink better. The flashiness of this fly really helps attract trout up to it, but many times I find they will strike the tailing fly instead of the rainbow warrior. This does not mean its not effective, just the opposite. It is very effective to get the fish moving out of their hole, to come take a look, but they elect to strike the less visible, and more realistic fly trailing it once they are close. As always I am listing all the materials used on this fly. Hook: Firehole sticks #317 in size 18 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in Red Tail: Natural Pheasant Tail Fibers Abdomen/wing case: Large sized Pearl Tinsel Dubbing: Tan Laser Dubbing Head Cement: Hard as Hull Original
  4. The Adams dry fly is one of the most popular dry flies ever created for good reason. It mimics a mayfly perfectly and has proven itself throughout many years of fishing. It is widely effective on many rivers and creeks, and will continue to be for many years to come, if not forever! One of the catskill style flies, this will float high when heavily hackled, has a nice profile, and can be tied in a wide range of sizes. I regularly tie 16-20 with these, but I know of some people tying all the way down to a size 26 and up to a size 10. If you get a Cree hackle, then you can use just one feather rather than two. However cree tends to be much more expensive, so I tie with the double feather method to achieve the brown and grizzly look. As always I am listing the materials I used on this fly. Hook I used: Firehole sticks #419 in size 16 Thread: Brown Veevus 16/0 Tail: Grizzly and Brown Rooster Neck Wings: Grizzly Hen neck Body: Adams Gray, UV2 Fine and Dry dubbing Hackle: Brown and Grizzly Rooster Neck Head cement: Hard as Hull
  5. McFlyLures

    Hares Ear

    The hares ear is a fly that has been around for ages, however its still as effective today as it was many many years ago when it was created. The simplicity is really what makes this fly so popular. Its very easy to tie with a very small amount of materials, yet still catches fish! I have no clue where this fly comes from, and no matter who you talk to, the answer changes. Everyone will say definitely they know, but someone else will say no thats not correct. So as much as I would love to give you an origination story, anything I say will be thought of as a complete utter lie and Bull... sooooo no originaton story for this one, sorry guys! More frequently you see these tied with a tail made of rabbit fur. They would clip a small clump, tie that in at the tail, then dub the body, then tie in a section of turkey wing or pheasant tail fibers for the wing case. I find using the Pheasant tail to start with at the tail negates an extra step, so its much easier and quicker to tie. Also I think it looks better as well, and for me fishes a bit better. So its a win win. Not only is this fly easy to tie, but it also looks really good. Its really cool that you are using the same dubbing throughout to create the abdomen and the thorax, but dubbed in different degree's of tightness to create a different look. The abdomen when dubbed tightly really does have the perfect "bugginess" look to it. And the thorax when dubbed loose will be perfect for looking like legs of nymph. This is really one of my favorite nymphs to fill a box with because its not only effective, looks great, and can be tied to mimic a wide variety of bug species, its very easy and quick to tie, and I can fill a box in a matter of a few hours. It also looks equally as nice with a bead head, and as different sizes as well. Heck, for really small ones try tying with a finer dubbing. Speaking of a wide variety of bug species, these are more than likely made to mimic baetis or mayflies, however I know they can mimic caddis as well. Some people even tie these with slight alterations to look like stoneflies. They are very versatile. As always I am providing a list of materials used on this fly Hook: Firehole Sticks #633 size 6 Thread: Veevus 6/0 Tail/Wing case: Natural Pheasant Tail Ribbing: I used Gold flat tinsel, but round or oval tinsel will work better (or even gold wire) Dubbing: Natural color Hares Ear Plus Resin: Solarez "Thin Hard" UV Resin
  6. In my opinion, the Stimulator is one of the best flies for using as an indicator. It floats high, is super buoyant, and mimics a large range of bug species. I could be wrong, but I believe it was originally created to be a stonefly imitator, however it can easily mimic hoppers, and even large caddis if tied to the correct sizes. Being very buoyant means that you can drop a bead head nymph behind it, or another small dry fly. This thing will hold up a large variety of other flies. Also, being such a large size, fish tend to hammer this fly hard! Some of my best strikes, where the fish literally came out of the water, have been with a stimulator. Using different colors of hackle, and dubbing can give you different effects. For my local streams in Colorado, this orange/brown body, with tan/grizzly head works great! But your local streams and rivers might vary. The hook commonly used for this fly is one with long shank, but with a curve to it. The hook I used is from Firehole sticks, but common hooks you can find at most fly shops will be Daiichi 1270 or TMC200. Of course you can use whatever you want, get creative! However a different shaped hook will give it a different look, and won't have that traditional Stimulator body curve to it.
  7. Foam beetles have been around for ages, and there really isn't anything new here. In fact I am sure many people have used ice dubbing before instead of peacock hurl. However I have tied them this way for a long time and really like them like this. So I thought I would show you the way I do them. As stated in the video, I really like using the ice dubbing because it will give the fly a more buggy look, almost looking like little legs under it, and it gives more flash, and is generally in my experience more durable. Its a win win on all fronts. Also I find dubbing this on to be quicker than wrapping peacock hurl up the hook evenly. These flies can be tied in a number of sizes, and I have tied them down to even size 16, and all the way up to size 6. Generally with a size 6 or larger, I like to go with a thicker foam, like a size 6mm vs the 2mm I am using here. Or double up the 2mm, which is nice because you have the ability to go 2 tone with the doubled up version. But no mater what size you tie these in, they tend to be very deadly, especially in the late summer when there are lots of terrestrials out. But any time you see beetles flying around, this is a good fly to have tied on your line. As always I am including a list of the materials I used on this fly. Hook: #14 Daiichi 1280 Thread: Black Veevus 6/0 Dubbing: Peacock Ice Dub Wing and hotspot: black and white 2mm fly foam Cement: Brush on Zap a Gap
  8. wet fly for trout https://youtu.be/PyN8YdePHjY
  9. Soft hackle fly patterns have been around since pretty much when fly fishing started. That does not mean they aren't effective now. In fact, they are still very effective, and in some circumstances more so. They are relatively easy to fish, and fish tend to bite hard on them and will almost rip the rod out of your hand! They are really good at fishing the hard to fish riffles. Cast about 30 degrees down stream, and let the line take the fly. This style of fishing is called swinging. You can either just keep your rod tip still, or shake the rod for a little more action. When you reach the end of your drift, make a few little bumps on the tip of the rod, and leave it for an additional 10 seconds or so. Then take a step or two down stream and repeat. You cover a lot of water, and always seem to entice those super active fish! We all know that is a recipe for a fun fight! This fly is tied in an olive body with porterage hackle. The body is tied a bit fatter than most soft hackles, and it mimics the body of a caddis. The hackle mimics the legs and head of the caddis. Caddis tend to emerge quickly up to the surface, and trout know this. So swinging this fly quickly through fast water is a great way to get bites. These are quite easy to tie once you get the hang of tying in the soft hackle. I can usually tie out 10-20 of them an hour, so I can fill a box quite quickly! Also the materials on this are rather inexpensive, and you really dont use that many. Just a hook, thread, wire, poly yarn, and a porterage feather. Very simple, yet effective! As always I listed the materials I used on this fly. Hook: TMC 3761 in size 14 Thread: Veevus 6/0 in olive Tail: Antron Yarn Wire: Small Gold UTC Ultra Wire Dubbing: Olive/Brown Hares Ear Dubbing Hackle: Hungarian Partridge Cement: Hard as Hull
  10. The Disco Midge is a great fly for fishing slightly off color water. Its flashy enough to catch the trout's attention, and not too flashy to scare them away. For instance, my local tail water (the San Juan River) will get cloudy in the winter due to the lake above turning over. This is the time I start using flashier flies like this disco midge. Hook: Lightning Strike SE7 in size 24 Thread: Veevus 16/0 in black Wrap: Fine Flashabou in Pearl Dubbing: Super Fine Dubbing in Black
  11. This small crawdad streamer works so well, I was catching fish I want even targeting with it. I went out fishing for carp, and got a carp and even some smallmouth bass. In fact, the carp I caught on this fly was 30" long, and the largest bass I caught that day was a good 3.5lbs. Most crayfish patterns are larger sized streamers, that are heavy and hard to cast. This fly is refreshingly light, and small. Easy to cast, and also easy for fish to swallow. When targeting carp or trout, sometimes too large is a bad thing. Hook: TMC 9395 in size 10 Thread: UTC Ultra Thread 140 in Brown Claws: Rubber Legs (preferably two tone) Dubbing: STS Trilobal Dub - Brown Stone Weight: Gold Dumbbell Eye 4mm or 5/32" Top Wing: Fox Fur Adhesive: Solarez "Bone Dry" UV Curing Resin
  12. Lets be honest, most people think of egg patterns as "not real flies". While that may be true, no one can argue that they aren't effective. There are times of the year, and certain fisheries that eggs can be one of the best flies you can use. Use it as an attractor, and at times you can use it as your main fly. While eggs aren't prestigious, or fancy, they will catch fish. So give them a try if you haven't before. The nice thing is, they are so easy to tie, you can tie 30+ an hour. Sit down, grab a drink, and tie them up in whatever colors you want. Load up a box, and you will be good for a few weeks of fishing! Hook: Umpqua U202 in size 18 Thread: UTC Ultra Thread 70 in red Fiber: Glo Bugs Yarn in "egg" color UV Resin: Solarez "Bone Dry"
  13. This fly is really simple and easy to tie. Beginner tiers will have no problem tying these, and seasoned tiers can tie 20+ of these in an hour. It is a great fly for fishing streams and rivers for trout, and also would work for crappie, bass and other lake fish. This even could work for some smaller saltwater species when using a saltwater approved hook. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOvhlKSURXI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOvhlKSURXI&feature=youtu.be Hook: Umpqua U301 - size 12 Thread: UTC 140 - color brown Tail/Wing: Blood Quill Marabou - Brown Body Wrap: Tinsel Twist Eye: 3D eyes - gold, 3mm Eye attachment: Krazy Glue Head Building: Solarez UV curing resin "Thin Hard Formula" Head finishing: Solarez UV curing resin "Bone Dry"
  14. Wooly buggers are probably one of the most popular and versatile flies anywhere you fish. From California to Colorado to New York, and not just USA, but other countries as well. Anywhere you can fly fish, you can use a wooly bugger. They work for both fresh and even saltwater, however they tend to be most commonly found as freshwater streamers. These flies are a bit more flashy then the chenille tied buggers, and therefor are better suited in my opinion for more aggressive fish, or even stained water conditions. Hook: Daiichi 1750 - size 8 Tail: Marabou - Brown Flash: Krystal Flash - Gold Dubbing: Starburst Dubbing Hackle: Rooster Cape - Brown Thread: Ultra thread 70 - Dark brown
  15. Tying these midges is no easy matter. The material list is small, just two color threads and some flashabou, but they are so small, that I have trouble with my not so good eyes to tie them. Your experiences might vary. However they are great for fishing on the san juan river. I lost a few of them my last trip, so this time I need to tie some more up for fishing. Hook: Daiichi 1110 - size 28 Thread: Ultra Thread 70 - dark brown and white Hot Spot: Flashabou - hot pink
  16. Wooly buggers are probably one of the most popular and versatile freshwater streamer patterns ever created. Sometimes however you want to fish really deep, and a simple bead head might not do enough. This dumbbell eye bugger will get you down deep, and has the added benefit of a jigging action. Hook: Size 10 Daichi 1750 Tail: Olive marabou Flash: Krystal flash Body Wrap: Fine gold wire, olive chenille, and olive saddle hackle Weight: Dumbbell eyes Thread: Ultra thread 70 denier in brown/olive UV Resin: Solarez "Bone Dry" Watch the video here, or view it on my website for more information... The link for the video on my website is below the imbedded video Dumbbell Wooly Bugger Dumbbell eye & hackle video: Mc Fly Angler www.mcflyangler.com
  17. Midge larve are probably the most important food source for trout. They are always in the water, and there are times of the year that the fish will feed exclusively on these. So you must make sure and always have a supply of midge larvae imitators on hand. I never fish a stream without flies like the san juan worm, zebra midge, and this little fly, the midge larvae. The simple midge larvae is a very easy fly to tie and takes just a minute or two. You can crank out a few dozen of these in an hour. They only use 2 types of materials, and are fairly inexpensive to tie up, depending on the quality of your hook. You can tie these in any size you want, but I find that 14-26 is best Hook: Umpqua U203 size 14-26 (the Daichi 1270, or mustad C53S also work well) Thread: Uni-thread 6/0 in red (Or you can go thicker or thinner for a different profile) Music: funnysong - Bensound.com
  18. Annelids and Midge larve are probably the most important food source for trout. They are always in the water, and there are times of the year that the fish will feed exclusively on these. So you must make sure and always have a supply of midge and annelid larvae imitators on hand. I never fish a stream without flies like the san juan worm, zebra midge, and this little fly, the midge ribbed annelid. The midge ribbed annelid is a very easy fly to tie and takes just a few minutes. You can crank out a dozen or more of these in an hour, and if you are really good, maybe even 20. They don't use a lot of materials, and are fairly inexpensive to tie up, depending on the quality of your hook. They are very effective as midge imitators when tied small like I am doing here on a size 20 hook. But the same concept can be applied with a nymph ribbing and a larger hook, say maybe 10-16 size. Hook: Umpqua U203 size 18-24 (the Daichi 1270, or mustad C53S also work well) Thread: Uni-thread 6/0 in red (any fine red thread will do, just make sure its strong enough to wrap tightly, and fine enough not to add bulk) Ribbing: Red vinyl ribbing - midge size Music: funnysong, ukulele - Bensound.com
  19. I take a large number of trout on this pattern I tie. Tiemco 100 size 12 - 16 Furled antron tail into body/post 1 ginger hackle 1 cream hackle
  20. J Tapio

    Glow Nymph

    Here is easy to tie nymph pattern for trout and grayling fishing... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imdBMeS2goA
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