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Found 216 results

  1. This Caddis utilizes CDC feathers that have been used already on other flies. Many times (with quite a few patterns) you will use just the tip of the CDC feather. Therefor you have almost an entire feather unusable for your following flies. But I utilize a clip to get all the goodness from each feather I can. You can use other colored CDC here as well to create different colored caddis. Its easy to tie, and floats super high because of the CDC. And best of all, no need to use floatant as CDC has a natural oil in it that keeps it afloat. Get creative with different feathers for your wings and create whatever type of caddis fly you want. The review of these chip clips came out earlier this week, if you want to see that video and a closer detail of the clips, you can view that here... https://youtu.be/Wp-dAzGLmHs Materials--------- Hook: Risen barbless dry fly 100, size 14 Thread: Veevus 16/0, in black Body: Stripped CDC Dubbing Wing: Hen Saddle Hackle: CDC Feathers Head Cement: Solarez Ultrathin UV Resin Just letting you know, even though I did not use someone else pattern to create this fly (basically just came up with it on my vise), that does not mean someone else has not come up with this pattern or something close to it in the past. I didn't go off of other's patterns for this, but I am sure somewhere along the way I probably saw something similar to this. If you know of a pattern similar, or the same that has already been tied, don't hesitate to let me know. Just keep in mind, I am in no way trying to steal someone elses pattern, so I would appreciate you not getting angry, just simply tell me where you have seen it before, and Id be happy to mention that fly here in the description section. With so many different patterns out there, someone probably has come up with a fly like this before, and it might even be a fairly common pattern. Just not one Ive personally took note of in the past. Thank you!
  2. Last Chance Cripples mimic an emerging mayfly (PMD to be exact) that has a crippled wing or cannot emerge from its casing. This is a fairly common phenomena for many aquatic bugs, especially the Pale Morning Dun. These crippled bugs make for an easy meal for trout and therefor trout will rise to them more often than a healthy bug. Healthy bugs fly away, but crippled bugs do not, and therefor its a bigger chance that their energy spent rising to a bug will result in a meal. Not only are these effective, but they are also very easy to tie. In fact, I find them slightly easier to tie than catskill style flies or even parachute flies. The only thing that costs a fair amount of money when tying these is the hackle and hook. The rest of the materials are not bad, and it doesn't take a ton of them. Once you have the dry fly hackle, and some hooks, all you really need is some dubbing and a couple variegated feathers. Mallard flank can be substituted for the expensive wood duck if you would like. Or even use a different tailing material. Also the turkey Biot body could be substituted for goose Biot, but I find the turkey to be longer and easier to work with for bodies. Do not save money though buying the hackle as you will be very disappointed in low quality hackle.
  3. The Everglades Special is an EP style saltwater streamer fly that is a specific coloration. This is a popular color pattern for, you guessed it, the everglades. Well, anywhere that fish eat mullet as its an imitation of mullet. Its a great fly for fishing Redfish, tarpon, sea trout, snook, and other saltwater predator fish. However this can be tied in other color variations to make a pattern that could work for other species of fish as well. It would be a great fly to fish for bass, pike and other large predatory freshwater fish. So I guess you could say its not just a saltwater streamer fly, but also could work as a freshwater streamer as well. As for the materials I used, traditionally they are tied with EP fiber, hence an EP style streamer fly. However I used something called Congo hair which is an inexpensive version. It works as well in my opinion, and fishes just the same. Most people will not know the difference between the two, because they are so similar. This fly works best stripped and paused where it will get a slight side to side action. But constant stripping of the fly works well, and the slow sink makes any pause seem to entice fish. The profile, coloration and action of this fly seem to entice even the most stubborn redfish. Once you get the hang of tying these also, it is quite quick to tie. You should not have much trouble at all filling a streamer box in an afternoon. Trimming these is probably the most difficult part of the entire operation, but once you get the hang of trimming a couple, you will start to speed up and get more consistent. I like to tie up multiple, then trim all of them at once. This helps with consistencies with trimming and tying as you get the hang of just doing the same thing over and over.
  4. The copper John really does not mimic many species of aquatic bugs. In fact, it doesn't really resemble any of them. I guess one could say it somewhat looks like a dragonfly nymph, maybe even a stonefly. But that is a very abstract representation. However, even though its not an identical representation of any specific food that trout or other fish target in a river or lake, that doesn't mean it won't catch fish. In fact, despite it looking like no organic life, it catches fish very well, in fact sometimes better than hyper realistic flies. Part of this could be due to the curiosity of trout, sunfish, or bass, but another part could be to how this thing fishes. It is very heavy, and possibly catches more fish because it can get down quicker to where the fish are. Another reason is that it is very visible in the water, with its bright copper abdomen, and flash back thorax. Especially helpful when fishing stained water. No matter the reason of why this fly is effective though, because it just is. That being said, it is not the easiest fly in the world to tie, but once you get the hang of it, they can be tied rather easily and quickly. And no one can argue the fact that it is fun to tie.
  5. Dragonfly and damselfly Nymphs are tasty snacks for may fish species. They are larger than many other aquatic bugs and therefor fish are more willing to move out of their hole for one. Many say an olive wooly bugger is a fly that can mimic a dragonfly nymph and I don't disagree. But where you want something more true to the look of a dragonfly nymph, I find there aren't a whole lot of popular patterns out there. Not saying they cannot be found, and you will always find a few at a fly shop. But when you search for them online, you find some samples of what people have tied, but not really any staple patterns. This I believe is because the vast majority are tying something that is too difficult to create at quantity. You can maybe bust through 5 an hour on a bench and that just isn't fast enough to effectively fill a box for most people. I designed this fly with that in mind. I wanted something simple, and easy. The body will be automatically built in both taper and the right width using just a single marabou feather. It also forms the tail. Same thing with the head and thorax of the fly, simple techniques and quick, easy ways of tying in the materials that are quite simple. So I hope you guys like this, and I hope it becomes a staple in your box especially during the times of year your local river or lake are holding dragonfly nymphs.
  6. I just moved to South Texas and small crayfish patterns tend to work very well for smallmouth bass, Guadalupe bass, panfish and the Rio Ciclids. They also work for other fish like catfish and trout as well. So I decided to come up with my own small crayfish pattern. Now, I am sure someone has tied something similar to this in the past, maybe even exact. If you know of a fly that is similar or exact that has already been tied, please let me know. Pretty much everything under the sun has been tied before, and someone always seems to lay claim to a pattern. In fact I will regularly have multiple people lay claim to the same fly every time I make a video. But, either way, I thought this combination of materials and way to put them onto a hook was something that would work for this area. So I made it. LOL Ok so, with that aside. This fly will be able to be fished like a nymph, but also like a crayfish streamer as well. I mean, you could float it under an indicator, or put it on as the sole fly, and site cast to fish. Bounce it off the bottom, or swim it right by them. I do think this fly is very versatile in the way you can fish it. You tell me what your experience with it is.
  7. I thought it would be interesting to see what homemade fly tying tools people have come up with over their years of experience. Things like dubbing brushes/spinners, packers, holders, etc. Or even other useful repurposed items you have on your benches. I ask because I was gifted a bobbin threader that is made with the metal wire. I had just been using a piece of doubled over 10lb tippet to thread it prior to this. After using the metal wired threader I noticed the thread kind of catching inside the bobbin, not enough to snag or cut it but enough to p*ss me off. Maybe I shouldn't have used this kind of threader on a ceramic tubed bobbin? Anyway friends... LETS SEE THEM SHANKS!
  8. Here is some new flies from my vice
  9. This fly has been in the making for a while now. Paul from the youtube channel Killer Fuz contacted me about his idea for making a fly on a worm hook. One that will be fully weedless. I had already wanted a good sunfish imitation, so I started tying it. Then I came up with adding the orange beads for both a rattle and to insure it swims hook point up, or keeled. It took quite a few tries though to get this just right, and the first time I tried fishing this, I was getting fouled on my fly line because there wasn't enough stiff materials to keep the line from wrapping around. However, with the addition of the Faux bucktail, this issue has been fixed. I am very happy to say, this is the final version of the fly. Well I take that back, I found out that I liked using Coq de Leon soft hackle feathers instead of shlappen for the body feather. But, all in all this is my final version of the fly and I could not be happier.
  10. Hopefully you guys saw my video on the large “Texas sized” grasshopper. If not, then watch it here... https://youtu.be/sOnY-HqOV6Y This hopper was created for bass and is a very large hopper pattern. My first video on this fly was a popular video gaining many views quickly, however I’ve improved on this fly, so I want to share with you the new and improved version now. I added a foam wing case and used bucktail instead of elk hair to make the underwing longer. I also added some red rubber legs to mimic the red in the flies legs. This hopper pattern is going to do amazing here in south Texas catching the large and aggressive bass. There aren't many dry flies specifically able to target bass out there, other than say a popper. And I really do think this will end up being one of my go to bass flies. It floats so well, that I can drop a streamer under it with some light split shot. It really is almost unsinkable. Here is a list of all the materials I used on this fly, and links to where you can purchase them. Hook : Risen streamer 300 size 6 Thread : Veevus 140 in brown Hook wrap : Gold chenille Body : 2mm foam in gold and brown Legs : Jig skirt replacements Flash : Gold krystal flash Wing : Bleached elk hair Adhesive : Brush on superglue Marker : Brown sharpie
  11. Hello friends, I propose to share my options for a good Red Tag flies) My collection
  12. Hello fellow members, I have a very straight forward question to every one of you - would you watch YouTube content that contains a foreign language but is subtitled in English? This includes fly tying tutorials, fly fishing adventures, trips, information about fly fishing tools, and anything else fly fishing related. If so, would you watch all of this content, or would only stick to watching fly tying, only fishing trips etc.? We are talking quality footage - fly tiers with decades of experience, videos shot with high-quality equipment, not your regular GoPro on the chest kind of stuff. I am not going to post any links, as the point of this thread is not to advertise, but to understand whether there is a demand for such content. Every single answer is very appreciated!! Whether it is positive or negative, so please, let me know your opinion. Thanks! Edit: to be clear, the original language of the video would NOT be English, the subtitles would be a translation INTO English
  13. Hi folks, Some of you may be familiar with Agostino Roncallo's CDC flies (not only CDC, but he's best known for those.) See https://www.flydreamers.com/en/fly-tying/agostino-roncallo-u99378 Here's one of his flies, the Mirage, tied with one CDC feather: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lp-37RH2MOc He says he uses grub fly hooks. J:son flies also use extended bodies, and unlike Roncallo, not just for mayflies - but they suggest an ultra-short dry fly hook, which they manufacture, for all their dry flies. My questions are: Are grub and caddis hooks the same? Is there a hook that will work for most extended body flies: Roncallo's CDC, J:son, "regular" extended body flies? (Could you kindly provide examples?) Finally, another (slightly unrelated) question, still about hooks: in Matching Major Eastern Hatches, Henry Ramsay calls for 2XS (short) wide-gap dry fly hooks such as the Tiemco 2488 when tying his CDC Adult Caddis. Do you think I can use regular-sized dry fly hooks instead, and just keep the body shorter (instead of buying more hooks)? Thanks! Confused in Connecticut PS The e-book My CDC Flies by Roncallo is available for free here: Part 1, Part 2.
  14. A few weeks ago, a customer of mine sent me a picture of a shrimp that he wanted me to tie for him. I had never seen this style shrimp before but gave it a go. After tying one, I realized just how nice this design was. The dubbed body gave a sorta transparent look, and the rest of the fly mimicked a shrimp perfectly! Absolutely one of the nicest shrimp patterns I have ever tied. I really like it. To be honest I cannot find this fly anywhere, so I cannot tell you exactly what it is called. So I am calling my version the Dubbed body shrimp. If any of you know the fly, and the name. Please tell me. Thank you! Here is a list of materials used on the fly. Hook: Gamakatsu SS15 in size 4 Thread: Veevus Power Thread 140 in Hot Pink Weight: Medium Dumbell Eye Pink Egg Sack: Para Post Wing in Hot Pink Leggs: Barred Rubber legs Feelers: Pearl Crystal Flash Eyes: Crustacean Mono Eyes Dubbing: Tan Senyo's Laser Dub UV Resin: Solarez Bone Dry
  15. Hello everybody! I'm new to this forum; but I've been tying flies for 6 months now. I've quickly gone from beginner to intermediate, then from there to somewhat experienced! I'm open to ANY new advice on places to get cheap materials (such as thread, wire, dubbing, hooks, feathers, everything else). I'm also open to any of you whom tie flies to ask for advice. My question today is: where would I go, either online or offline, to start selling my flies for about $0.75-$1.00 a fly? I'm located near SW Ohio, and there aren't very many fly fishers here. I'm aware of how to ship and what not, but I don't know where to go to get my business started. I also want to know where to go to sell materials as well, if anyone can help me with that. Anyways, I appreciate the time and effort of anyone who helps me out! Please, feel free to email me at: [email protected]
  16. Hi, Here my new fly tying video; subscribe to my YouTube channel!, https://youtu.be/0-Vp2_hWLBc
  17. https://youtu.be/C6nqMXCFOoo
  18. The Zug bug is a fly that works really well, however it doesn't seem to resemble any particular bug specifically. Not sure really what it is supposed to mimmic. Some say caddis (cased or pupa), and while that could be, it really isn't a good representation. However, that means nothing in fishing. Something doesn't have to look identical to a forage for a fish to eat it. And trout love this fly. I find especially in the winter time for some reason. Although I have had them take this fly year round. The fly is also relatively easy to tie compared to some other flashy patterns like copper johns or prince nymphs (both of which also don't mimic anything specific, but trout love them!). As always I am listing all the materials used on this fly below. Hook: Firehole Sticks #609 in size 14 Thread: Veevus 6/0 in Black Tail: Peacock Swords Ribbing: Silver Tinsel Body: Peacock Hurl Hackle: Hen neck or saddle Wing Case: Natural Mallard Flank Head Cement: Original Hard as Hull
  19. This fly was originally created by Lance Egan, and is one of the best attractor patterns Ive ever fished. It's flashy, bright, and effective. I love fishing this as my lead fly, then drop to something a bit more realistic behind it. My favorite flies to drop behind this are the RS2, Pheasant tail, or black beauty. All of which can mimic midge or Baetis pupa and emergers quite well. So this fly can also be tied with a glass bead, and I believe originally it was created this way. However I like using brass beads here because it gives the fly a bit more weight, and I really like using this as my lead fly, to help other flies sink better. The flashiness of this fly really helps attract trout up to it, but many times I find they will strike the tailing fly instead of the rainbow warrior. This does not mean its not effective, just the opposite. It is very effective to get the fish moving out of their hole, to come take a look, but they elect to strike the less visible, and more realistic fly trailing it once they are close. As always I am listing all the materials used on this fly. Hook: Firehole sticks #317 in size 18 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in Red Tail: Natural Pheasant Tail Fibers Abdomen/wing case: Large sized Pearl Tinsel Dubbing: Tan Laser Dubbing Head Cement: Hard as Hull Original
  20. I just started fly tying last month and started with the suggested patterns, one being the woolly bugger. I fished some that I tied a few weeks ago at my favorite kettle pond. Every dozen or so casts I'll pull the fly in to check it and noticed that my leader was twisted. I've never have this problem before and thought it was strange. So this past weekend I went out again but put on a new leader with the same woolly bugger. Son of a... the leader was twisting again. So this BH woolly bugger must be doing some serious barrel rolling the entire time I'm stripping it in. Can't imagine a trout is going to go for a baitfish doing that haha. Anyone experience or heard of a similar issue? Is it the way I've tied the fly? I can't imagine my cast would cause this twist. I followed Tim Flaggers BH woolly bugger recipe on YouTube. I don't know much about fly tying yet, so I can really troubleshoot what I've done wrong. If it's nice next weekend I'll have to drag it through the water at my feet to see if I can see anything obvious. Any help would be appreciate. Thanks!
  21. A few months ago I tied up a fly called the Brahma Bugger, which I did not invent but loved fishing and tying the fly very much! The fly was originally tied by the tightlines youtube channel, and I re-named the fly "soft hackle bugger" because I did not use a brahma pelt, but instead used a soft hackle pelt from whiting. That video did really well, and that fly has been an amazing fish catcher for me. So I set out to improve on the fly, and make it better for a wider range of fish species. I wanted to articulate the fly, and give it even more movement in the water. So I present you with the articulated brahma bugger, which catches more fish than I could imagine. In fact, it far out fished any other fly I had with me on my last trip. I could not keep the fish off of it. And it seemed to attract some really large trout as well! This articulated fly is really my favorite streamer now, and I don't think I will be fishing anywhere without at least a few in my box. As always I am listing all the materials I used on this fly. Hook: Firehole sticks #811 in size 6 Shank: Small sized Fish Joint Thread: Veevus 6/0 in Olive Feathers: Whiting Coq de Leon soft hackle with chickabou pelt died Chartreuse Wire: Small Intruder wire in black Cement: Brush on Zap a Gap Head cement: Solarez "Bone Dry" UV resin
  22. The Royal Wulff is a great fly, except its really difficult to tie in those calf tail wings. But I have come up with an easier way, that I think actually is better. It makes the fly float higher, easier to see, and is much easier to tie in. In small mountain creeks and streams, there is one fly that seems to out preform all the others. Of course thats this fly, the Royal Wulff. There isn't a time that this fly isn't in my box with hiking in the back country. Great little flies. I am not sure really what the trout mistake it as, some say a flying ant. But no matter what the trout think it is, it works, and that is all that matters! Hook: Firehole Sticks #419 in size 16 Thread: Veevus 10/0 in black Tail: Moose Body Hair Abdomen: Peacock Hurl Hot Spot: Uni Floss Wing: EP fiber Hackle: Mets Rooster Neck Cement: Hard as Hull
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