Jump to content
Fly Tying
eastern fly

fishing kayaks

Recommended Posts

you're right about that Joel... nobody in his right mind should stand up in a canoe. I can't understand how people can stand up on a paddleboard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Replying to JS (on my work computer again so no "quote" function available, sorry) --

 

JS, I agree with you completely that no one type of watercraft is for everyone. I will admit that I perhaps get a tad overly enthusiastic in recommending the NuCanoe :) All I was really saying to the OP was that, if a stable stand-up fishing platform was what he was after, he should check out NuCanoe. Reading back over my post, though, it does sound like I'm at least implying that there's no need to look at anything else. That was not my intention. As I said, I've had such a great experience with my NuCanoe that I tend to get a little wound up when talking about it.

 

The WS Ride 135 is a great boat, there's no doubt in my mind. I had just about made up my mind to get one when I happened to stumble across a boat show close to me where NuCanoe had their boats on display, and I ended up falling hard for the Frontier 12 because, once I paddled it, it became obvious that it was the right boat for me.

 

Ultimately, what works is going to be different for different folks for all kinds of different reasons. When it's all said and done, the "right" boat is the one that gets you out on the water and enjoying the experience of being there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bryon's right... we all have a tendency not to pay close attention to the OP's specific request and situation, and instead go off on a tangent recommending what we, ourselves, use and not what we think the OP wants.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a set in kayak that I use and have no trouble fly fishing from it. Weight was one of the main considerations when I bought it. I wanted something that I could carry to wherever I planed to launch it. I fish mostly small lakes and rivers with it. If I were to fish bays or open water I would probably get a SOT. The best advice I can give is to try different types before you buy one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bryon's right... we all have a tendency not to pay close attention to the OP's specific request and situation, and instead go off on a tangent recommending what we, ourselves, use and not what we think the OP wants.

Well FlaFly The OP wanted suggestions on "fishing kayaks". You bring up a good point about portability, that is the exact reason I bought a Wilderness Systems Pungo, as well as taking lake water well. In it's day, when I bought into it many years ago now sit on tops were not yet popular though. Today they are all the rage, them and these half yak things. The OP I don't think mentioned portability but I'm sure it's something he is considering. In my case, I can car top my kayak or I can carry twins on our utility trailer and car top the canoe . Most people probably aren't thinking along those lines but with friends and family I've had occasion to do that.. But then I have the trailer anyway and that is a game changer for me. Really with that , any paddle craft is an option. Again, the OP doesn't mention loading,carrying etc.. So we have to kind of wing our replies I suppose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some guy has marketed a by 4 x 8 sheet of foam
It will hold 3 to 4 adults put any devices on it you want . Thought it was pretty cool first time I saw it
I'll try to find a link to it

Here it is:

http://www.feather-raft.com/about.html

And I use to have one of these except mine was home made and I put a trolling motor and depth finder on it

http://www.montanafoamboats.com/index.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an Outcast pontoon for several years, now I'm in a yak, Wilderness Systems Tarpon 120 (2011).

I loved the pontoon, went to the kayak for a number of reasons, mostly to minimize all the streamside fuss putting it together and dismantling at end of day (don't have trailer). Kayak has also been more versatile for me.

I had to adapt a little to fly casting from the low seated position of kayak, but find it to be just fine; I have no issue with slapping the water on the back cast, but at first I did have a little issue with that; had to practice.

Key thing in my thinking is the type of water you'll be fishing. I'm not up to speed on the new kayaks I've seen come out that you can stand in, they look great, but I doubt you want to try standing in any of them in class 2 or 3 rapids, which I float all the time. This would be the deal breaker for me.

If my budget allowed, I'd have one of those new jobs, a jon boat, and my Tarpon. My budget supports a one-kayak-does-all solution, and my Tarpon is that. Goes everywhere, lake, gentle stream, roiling river and gets the job done nicely. I will be getting a trailer for the kayak (that's just lazy because it's no hassle to put it up on the kayak rack on our van ...), but tha's the end of the budget.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Likewise DJ, we use the canoe in class 2 and 3 as well. Actually run the 3, many rocks to avoid and strainers to avoid, but will fish the tail pool and in class 2. I wouldn't take my Pungo in that, it's more made to track in still water or actually run the river of a class grade 1 or maybe 2.. If I'm not mistaken your tarpon has the tracking troughs in the bottom and no keel line. The Pungo a semi V bottom. Anyway, what you speak of and what I am speaking of in terms of waters fished has no resemblance to anything I've seen in videos of fishing kayaks or NuCanoes etc. And no mention of anchoriing systems etc. In fast waters and waters with rising and falling levels due to dams up stream, the last thing you do is anchor over the side. We use a pulley setup off the stern so the canoe can face down river and drift naturally off the mushroom anchor. It's very stable . But here is the point, all this stuff should be considered ! Types of waters fished matters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an Outcast pontoon for several years, now I'm in a yak, Wilderness Systems Tarpon 120 (2011).

I loved the pontoon, went to the kayak for a number of reasons, mostly to minimize all the streamside fuss putting it together and dismantling at end of day (don't have trailer). Kayak has also been more versatile for me.

I had to adapt a little to fly casting from the low seated position of kayak, but find it to be just fine; I have no issue with slapping the water on the back cast, but at first I did have a little issue with that; had to practice.

Key thing in my thinking is the type of water you'll be fishing. I'm not up to speed on the new kayaks I've seen come out that you can stand in, they look great, but I doubt you want to try standing in any of them in class 2 or 3 rapids, which I float all the time. This would be the deal breaker for me.

If my budget allowed, I'd have one of those new jobs, a jon boat, and my Tarpon. My budget supports a one-kayak-does-all solution, and my Tarpon is that. Goes everywhere, lake, gentle stream, roiling river and gets the job done nicely. I will be getting a trailer for the kayak (that's just lazy because it's no hassle to put it up on the kayak rack on our van ...), but tha's the end of the budget.

What did you do with your Outcast?

 

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
djtrout said:
"went to the kayak for a number of reasons, mostly to minimize all the streamside fuss putting it together and dismantling at end of day"

 

This is exactly why I switched from a pontoon to a kayak. It was a good 20-30 minute job to get the pontoon assembled and inflated once I got it to the water. Kayak was down off the roof and back up at the end of the day in one shot, easy-peasy. I do have a trailer for it now, but do still occasionally car-top it when I take it into places that are too rough for a trailer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DaveG I also have a Tarpon120 which I like extremely well. Anchor trolleys are normally one of the first rigging options people do to their fishing kayaks.

With a simple trolley system, your stern or bow can face the current, and additionally any variation of angle can be achieved.

 

A drag chain in a river is usually what I use.

 

The Tarpon has a slight keel angle as well as channels. It tracks well in addition to being extremely agile.

 

Two performance factors set well designed Sit On Top kayaks apart from all other paddle-craft, superb secondary stability and self-bailing hulls.

Those factors do not excuse the operator from using common sense... but the advantages of a WELL DESIGNED sit on top are huge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...