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Fly Tying

DrLogik

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About DrLogik

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

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  • Favorite Species
    Native Brook Trout
  • Security
    22

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  • Website URL
    http://www.drlogik.com

Profile Information

  • Location
    Charlotte, North Carolina

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  1. Mr. Herter was quite the carnival barker when it came to business. He built an empire selling generally decent merchandise. There's no doubt everyone loved his catalogs for the slogans he came up with. As said earlier, yes he must have been quite the character.
  2. Hazel is a great stream! My favorite is Eagle Creek on the same side of the lake and the last stream before Fontana Dam. It gets a lot less fishing traffic but is smaller. Back in 2017 I spent 5 days in there with my then 16 year old son.
  3. Skeet, The "Tenkara" leaders I purchased (two) were basically just twisted leaders like the ones discussed, albeit in fancy-dancy packaging. I, too, found a video on YouTube that explained how to make your own and that's what I did. For a heck of a lot cheaper. The main difference is the expensive Tenkara leaders that come out of Japan (the ones I bought) were made from Flouro-carbon. I'm not sold on that stuff anyway, so finding a cheaper yet better solution was very cool.
  4. I make these for Tenkara fishing. Save a TON of money over buying specialty Tenkara leaders. I usually take a spool of line with me just in case I feel the need to make a custom leader on the spot. Very handy. I have found that it makes it easier to manage the ends of the line if I drape the lines down off the back deck on my house. They don't get tangled as easily.
  5. When it's too hot and the water temps are too hot also, I give the trout a break and go hiking instead. The trout hate the heat just like we do.
  6. The only time I have had a negative experience with snapping turtles is when they are on land trying to get somewhere and I'm in the way. They don't like that one bit and get aggressive if you get near. I once, (only once) tried to help a smallish sized snapper who was crossing a busy road get to his desired destination. I picked him up by the front of his shell and the back. DANG!!!! is he's got a long neck!!!!!! Dropped him immediately. Little sucker was sporting a nasty 'tude so I got a stick and coached him to safety. I won't be doing that very often. Where I live, North Carolina, these guys look at Water Moccasins as food. Years ago while building a bridge over a creek we would often see "Cooders" (as the locals called them) chasing a large Water Moccasin in the creek. The things are fearless but if they are in the water I don't think you should be afraid necessarily, unless of course you are fishing and wading naked, but I would give them a wide berth if possible.
  7. I like the modern version that have the clip with rubber nub but have grown fond of my JVise pliers from South Africa on the right.
  8. Best bang for the buck lines, in my opinion, are Hook & Hackle-branded lines. Regularly $39 bucks but often go on sale for $25 bucks. The lines are made by Cortland and perform just as well and handle about the same as the traditional Cortland "444 Peach" lines. So much so that I can't really tell much difference other than the H&H line is 1/3 the price. https://store.hookhack.com/Hook-Hackle-Classic-Hi-Floater-Fly-Lines/departments/713/
  9. As a novel exercise, try tying a few flies without a bobbin of any kind. Cut a length of thread you "think" is long enough and start wrapping the fly. You have to let go of the thread to pick up material? Tie a quick half-hitch or clip an old wood clothes pin on the thread to hold tension. I know some of you may be old enough to remember that's how they got started. I'm one of those people. I often use this method when tying North Country Spider patterns.
  10. As a novel exercise, try tying a few flies without a bobbin of any kind. Cut a length of thread you "think" is long enough and start wrapping the fly. You have to let go of the thread to pick up material? Tie a quick half-hitch or clip an old wood clothes pin on the thread to hold tension. I know some of you may be old enough to remember that's how they got started. I'm one of those people. I often use this method when tying North Country Spider patterns.
  11. DrLogik

    New Vise

    My opinion alone... I bought a rotary years ago, a Renzetti Traveler, but sold it about two years later. I found it completely un-needed for the type and style flies I tie (mostly "traditional" or Catskill style flies). I got good at twirling the shaft around to speed up tying but I really didn't "take" to that kind if vise. If you're in to tying tube flies then a rotary is the way to go but for traditional flies, I found it...cumbersome actually. I would suggest getting a used one and really try it out before spending big bucks for a new one. BTW, I went back to my Dyna-King Pro vise. It's been old reliable for many years.
  12. My guess is it was designed to re-spool off of a standard spool to fill its spool with thread.
  13. Looks a lot like an all wood bobbin that Wasatch might make, although I don't recall them making an all wood bobbin.
  14. When I was just getting started as a kid in the early 1970's it was Reuben Cross. During the 2000's it was Oliver Edwards and Dave Brandt. From 2010 on it was mostly Dave Brandt and Del Mazza. I prefer the traditional patterns, materials and methods.
  15. Mogup, Once Charlie gets to know you he'll sell you items that aren't available to first time purchasers. You might ask him if he has a Cree neck that he'll sell you... DrL
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