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Fly fishing books are expensive


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45 replies to this topic

#16 Poopdeck

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 10:09 PM

If you want a good pattern database one needs to look no further then the fly pattern database on this very site. It contains patterns by some exceptional tiers from right here. I'm not sure who George danials and joe humphreys are but I bet they aren't any better or more knowledgeable tiers then some of fellows on this site.

Surely I can't be the only one to use this sites pattern database.

#17 CasualAngler

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 12:07 AM

The Pattern Database is very handy, but the SBS Forum is so-so only because my Tablet doesn't like to play the embedded videos smoothly. They're all on YouTube, though. All that I learned about fly tying I got from YT, this Site & the Links that various Members have posted.

E-books are convenient, but there's something to be said for a hardcover that was given to you as a gift by someone special, or having a set of related books that aren't available in e-book form. The same can apply to reading a print newspaper while having a cup of coffee at the local diner.

Just my .02

#18 Edward Snowden

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 07:40 AM

This discussion is a good example of why it is so hard to be a teacher.  Different people have different learning styles, and what is right for you is definitely not right for everybody.  As indicated in this thread, some people learn by watching, some learn by reading, others need to be shown how to do something, while some learn by listening.  There is no "right way" to learn as a lot is based on your brain's wiring.  You cannot say someone is "wrong" because the have a different learning style.  A lot of kids struggle in school because their teacher(s) cannot teach using the method that is best for their style of learning.  Imagine being in a classroom with 30 students and trying to figure out how to present the material so each student, with their own style of learning can grasp the material.



#19 rstaight

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 07:43 AM

If I am learning a different technique or was just starting YouTube is an excellent resource. Only problem is I can't ask a question.

If I have the technique I would much rather have a book. But I still can't ask a question if it's a new style of fly for me.

"Scholars have long known that fishing eventually turns men into philosophers.  Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to buy decent tackle on a philosopher's salary." - Patrick F. McManus


#20 mikechell

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 08:21 AM

Many times, you CAN ask a question on YouTube.  If the video poster is interested in helping people, he/she has allowed comments, and they will look at and answer questions that show up there.

You definitely CAN'T do that with a book.


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#21 Poopdeck

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 08:42 AM

This discussion is a good example of why it is so hard to be a teacher.  Different people have different learning styles, and what is right for you is definitely not right for everybody.  As indicated in this thread, some people learn by watching, some learn by reading, others need to be shown how to do something, while some learn by listening.  There is no "right way" to learn as a lot is based on your brain's wiring.  You cannot say someone is "wrong" because the have a different learning style.  A lot of kids struggle in school because their teacher(s) cannot teach using the method that is best for their style of learning.  Imagine being in a classroom with 30 students and trying to figure out how to present the material so each student, with their own style of learning can grasp the material.


True but this has no bearing on the future relevance of print media v. Digital. Remember you can still read, watch, listen and ask questions in the digital age. With print you can only read. Neither medium helps much in the doing department although I could make a case that digital would be immensely more helpful in doing.

#22 flytire

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 10:18 AM

1XfZwTK.jpg

 

i like books

 

i like to know about pattern histories, seeing flies on how they are tied, techniques that youtube videos dont teach and other fly tying information that is not available on the internet

 

i do use google more than most people to find info on patterns

 

i do post some patterns in the fly tying database on the forum when its working

 

you certainly cant go thumbing through the book "wet flies" by ken sawada on the internet and get every pattern described in the book


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#23 saltydancindave

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 11:33 AM

1XfZwTK.jpg

 

i like books

 

i like to know about pattern histories, seeing flies on how they are tied, techniques that youtube videos dont teach and other fly tying information that is not available on the internet

 

i do use google more than most people to find info on patterns

 

i do post some patterns in the fly tying database on the forum when its working

 

you certainly cant go thumbing through the book "wet flies" by ken sawada on the internet and get every pattern described in the book

Probably have more than 10 times this amount of fly fishing -  fly tying books & some 50 + years of various magazines on the subject, some that were almost & nearly unavailable for months or years to get to read. Now it's mostly "at hand" research instead of going with the Internet that quite a bit is still not posted on.



#24 rstaight

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 11:49 AM

Yes you can ask questions on YouTube but you wait for the answer. The only time its immediate is if the poster is watching it at the time. That is when you need the answer.

May as well use a book.

"Scholars have long known that fishing eventually turns men into philosophers.  Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to buy decent tackle on a philosopher's salary." - Patrick F. McManus


#25 Mark Knapp

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 02:04 PM

I can see it both ways, a good video tutorial is very hard to beat, but, If I wanted to tie all the Ray Bergman flies it would be much more preferable for me to have them all in a book.

 

Beside that, a book of color plates with all that eye candy by Don Bastian in it would truly be a thing to treasure.

 

I have a few autographed copies of fly tying books by some of the legends, I can't get that from a video.

 

It's probably inevitable but I hate to see the era of the written word go by the wayside. There's something to be said for having the tangible item in hand to hand down to your kids.

 

As a side note, I bought a used hard copy of "The Feather Thief" on eBay. It was less expensive than the ebook. When I was done with it, I handed it over to two of my friends to read. I'm sure, it will go to others to read. Can't do that with an ebook.

 

I like both, the internet tutorials and the hard copy depending on what I'm doing at the time.



#26 RickZieger

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 04:35 PM

I tend to go with books. The computer is not near my fly tying table.

With old age disease I don't always remember all the steps.  With the book I can.

I have enough books now that I will  never get all the patterns tied.

 

Rick



#27 JC Hoppaire

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 04:58 PM

Periodically check out this link for free e-books from Amazon:

 

https://www.amazon.c...oding=UTF8&tf=1

 

Occasionally some great titles come up like:

 

Essential Saltwater Flies, by  Ed Jaworowski

 

Clouser's Flies: Tying and Fishing the Fly Patterns of Bob Clouser



#28 whatfly

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 11:22 PM

There's a lot of information on the web, just not all of it, especially stuff that predates the 1990's.  Mostly it is the low hanging fruit that gets coopted.  I imagine anyone who reflexively goes to youtube was just as likely to watch TV over read a book.  That's fine, because as said different people learn different ways, but that is different than disregarding the treasure trove of knowledge that still exists in book form.  And as far as the assertion of printed media being dead, the same was said about vinyl (now there's a resurgence I really can't explain).



#29 tjm

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 03:27 AM

Lots of out standing videos on youtube and I like watching some of those guys work. That said I can watch a video twenty times and pay close  attention, but have zero memory of it twenty minutes later. I can read a book and retain a high percentage of it for years. All video is to me is entertainment, slide shows are the same. Zero information transfer. How do you high light a line on a video or write notes in the margins.

Books, can be propped up on the bench for easy reference and you can flip pages back and forth to reinforce what you've read/seen, a book can be used as a weight to keep things in place or a spacer  to raise the pedestal higher on a low table. A book holds tension on your rod winding thread. And all the other  things mentioned above by the bookies.



#30 vicente

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 05:12 PM

For learning stuff for me typically the internet whether written or video is my go to I can find diamgrams, charts, videos, written instructions or information, color photos and compare multiple sources to verify information in minutes for free. If I need to "highlight" something I can save the video and skip to the desired segment whenever I want I can also just copy the written version into my phone and highlight it there. I don't really understand the need for buying books to learn something as basic as tying a fly technical manuals are a bit different.

I do prefer to read actual books if I am not trying to learn how to do something, while I haven't read in a while during jr high and high school I would typically read 350-400 pages a week often more just for something to do, I would never sit down and stare at my phone or a computer to read a novel.

Mikechell what are some of your favourite sci-fi authors and books? I have always been a big asimov fan, the last set i worked through was the otherland series by tad william's, not that many books but they are massive.