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Fly Tying

utyer

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About utyer

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 07/20/1944

Previous Fields

  • Favorite Species
    Salmonids
  • Security
    2007

Profile Information

  • Location
    Orlando, Florida since November 2012

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  1. For my personal needs, I rarely use hackle at all. Most of my mayfly patterns are comparaduns, and all my caddis dries are without hackle. When I have to use hackle, I always use saddles.
  2. There are no unbreakable rules in tying. They are called variations. Any material that is close can be used. No fish has a "rulebook." Try it out if it works keep on doing it. If not find other materials. Most of mine are tied with white macrame cord for wings.
  3. Kelly Galloup has 2 very good videos on Deer hair and elk hair types and selection. Start with this one, which covers different deer hairs options, and how to tell good hair from bad hair,. This second one, covers many other hairs and selection: These will give you a very comprehensive look at hairs and selection of good hair for your needs .
  4. utyer

    My new shop

    Very nice job on the bench. Looks like it will last a long time.
  5. You should keep right on tying your "ugly" buggers. The original pattern had longer and softer hackle than what you find in the shop. The "professional" flies available in shops and on-line are to catch anglers NOT fish.
  6. Your list of flies is a good start. Add some Schminnows in White, and your set. A schminnow is nothing more than a woolly bugger with a pearlescent crystal flash body and a white tail. Hackle is seldom used. Clouser Minnows Tan or Chartreuse over white. EP Shrimp: tan is usually good. Foam Gurglers in White. EP bait fish of some sort Light green, tan and white. I would say that 80% of all my flies are white. or pearlescent. Since I keep catching every kind of fish on white flies, I really scaled back on colors. For peacock bass, flies with orange or chartreuse are popular options.
  7. I follow Norm's method, and simply use a marker or nail polish to mark the spools. I don't use that many different threads, and almost all my thread is white or monofilament. So I have 3 or 4 spools wound with the same sizes. It then is a long time before reloading the spools. Currently have 18 spools. and 4 bobbins.
  8. My Dyna-King Sidewinder came with standard jaws, and I can go much smaller and larger than your range. They are a lifetime investment, mine is over 25 years about 27 years old, maybe more, I traded for it used. Still have no problems with it. The trick to all the Dyna-King vises is the detend in the clamping arm. Properly adjusted one of the three grooves in the jaw will hold a large range of hooks firmly. Learning how to adjust and clamp the jaws is the a little bit different than some other vises. The first owner didn't learn how to properly close the jaws into the detent, and damaged the forcing collet. Dyna-King replaced it for me at no charge. My second favorite vise ever.
  9. I have "processed" a lot of game bird skins. and even some of the commercial skins and necks I have gotten. A good washing in soap and water won't hurt the skins, but it will reduce the fatty oils. Use Dawn liquid it seems to work well on greasy things. Just use some salt on the skins place skin down on newspaper, and dry them in the sun if you can.
  10. Some of the old "dope" tiers used to use were full of solvents we don't use today. Like airplane glue, they were enough to get you high if you were not careful. These days I use water based rod varnish. No odor and no fumes.
  11. Many of the side feathers on the tail just don't have long enough barbs to make it easy to use. The center tail feather will have the longest barbs. Turkey tails are longer and might be easier to start learning with. I use Turkey Tail most of the time on larger nymphs.
  12. I have found a lot of things, lures, flies, boxes, a full tackle box, the usual assortment of stuff. I have also given a lot back to the stream, I would still say I am ahead in the lost and found department. I have found two digital cameras. The first I was able to track down the owner (it took several months,) the second went unclaimed, and 10 years later I still use it. I stepped into the first trough the first day I was casting in the surf, and lost my glasses. They were in my shirt pocket. A couple walking the beach came over to check that I was ok, and I told them about the glasses. About 30 minutes later they walked back up to me, with a pair of glasses. Sure enough, they were my glasses. I was visiting friends in Wyoming, and one of the neighbors gave me directions to a good spot. Go exactly 13.7 miles up the road after the pavement ends and there will be a turn out to part, At first glance, there is a very steep slope to the stream. But if you walk just a few yards to your left. You will find an old blocked off road right down. When I got to the bottom, I found a Leatherman multi tool on a rock. The leather holder was dry, and the tool was in perfect shape. I of course check with the guy when I got done fishing, and it was NOT his tool, so I still have that. These directions are accurate, now all you have to do is find the exact road I am referring to. Fishing was very good, and I have been back a few more times.
  13. Gunnar's site is a great resource for tying big files for predator species of all kinds. Start with his Beginner Predator Series. Then move on into the more complex extended body and weight distribution techniques. He has a LOT of videos and the Beginner series will get you into the basics. Learn the basic techniques first. I see you spend winters in UT, and from the username, I assume you are a ski bum. Where do you hang out and what kind of skiing do you do. I have a friend that does a lot of Backcountry skiing. I spend my time in Utah in the Spring, and then only long enough to pickup my buddy and head to Idaho for the fishing.
  14. utyer

    My new shop

    Nice looking layup of the pallet wood. Looks like you will have a really nice bench when its finished.
  15. Down eye is the most common. but up-eye, and straight eyed hooks just fine for me. I prefer an up-eye on soft hackles, and emerger patterns, and straight eye hooks on panfish, warmwater, and Saltwater patterns. There can be all kinds of reasons why some people like one over another, personally, I will use whatever I have at any given time.
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