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mvendon

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About mvendon

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    Trout
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    2007

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    Upstate, New York

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  1. Along the line of extended patterns, if you have the materials they work good for cranefly / daddylong leg patterns. Here's one that I used that works pretty well, though I wish it floated a little better while fishing. Regards, Mark
  2. Like others have mentioned, you did a really nice job on those flies! The third one down in your first post is really close to the way that Fran tied his. He used a lot of hair for the wing. He used quite a bit of dubbing too , but tied them really fast and rough that left the thread showing in spots. If you want some more ideas for patterns that use snowshoe here in the northeast check this link out. Just scroll down to see lots of patterns that Tony Ritter has tied. He used to be a member here, but like tons of other folks, just doesn't come here any longer. His site hasn't been updated in a while either by the looks of it, but there's lots of good patterns there. Regards, Mark
  3. Here's my quick and dirty attempt. The wing is folded ozark oak mottled turkey that's very old. Ginger rooster streamer cape feather for the tail and hackle. Stripped natural condor quill for the body. It's on a size 12 3906b Mustad hook. The original pic is lit up very bright so the colors are a little washed out by it.
  4. @Moshup, Both of those came out just fine! The tapered body can take some time if you don't use the right combination of thread underneath. Bob Petti has a tutorial on them over at the Global Fly Fisherman site. The type that he uses takes quite a while to build, even though it's somewhat thick to start with. I used it as the secondary thread since it really flattens out and makes a nice base for the floss body on some of his patterns that I've tied. I think it's a real unique feature compared to all the streamers out there that have been created over the years. They used to have lots of his patterns over at The Streamer List before that forum became pretty dead.
  5. Right back at you chugbug27 on that Silver Monkey. It came out super nice! Regards, Mark
  6. Thank you Moshup ! I have the colors that I used listed right below the pic. The picture that's in the updated 1995 Bates book shows a pretty dark wing. I used an old, very dark olive cape for the inside and a Whiting American cape natural medium dun for the outside feathers. They're pretty curvy and I should have re - aligned the back a little before taking a pic. Regards, Mark
  7. Queen Of Waters Bucktail Hook : Streamer Head: Black Tag: Fine gold tinsel Tail: A small bunch of guard hairs from the tail of a cottontail rabbit Body: Wound smoothly with orange wool, palmered from tail to head with a light brown saddle hackle which is built up at the throat Wing: A bunch of guard hairs from a Kodiak bear over which is small bunch of guard hairs from the back of a cottontail rabbit. The rabbit hair should be one-third as long as the bear hair when the fly is dressed Cheeks: Jungle cock From Bates Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing. This version can be used for trout or bass all season through and was created by Mr. William Reynolds, a prominent fly dresser that used to be in Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Red Horse Streamer Hook: Size 6 or 8 6X long streamer Head: Black Tail: The tips of two yellow hackles, on each side of which is an orange hackle, all the same length and very short Body: Wound with white wool, slightly tapered Ribbing: Oval silver tinsel Throat: The same as the tail Wing: Two dark olive green hackles, on each side of which is a gray blue dun hackle; all the same length and extending well beyond the tail Cheeks: Jungle cock A Lew Oatman pattern designed for bass in waters where the Red Horse sucker is common. It's another one that's out of Bates Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing book. It looks better in person than in my crappy picture since you can't see the almost glowing tail and throat that both colors make.
  8. This is dirt cheap and works really well for deer tail hair evening. I put my thumb over the middle and hold it at a slight angle to try to keep the hair tips from slipping out the bottom. It's really not for super big streamer patterns either. If the deer hair is really long, too much will hang out of the top and it just won't work all that great. You can find them here Really nice tying on both the streamers and that dry fly 🙂 Regards, Mark
  9. Cains River Aleck's Wonder Size 2 Mustad 3906b Tail: 2 barred wood duck with a slip of blue goose shoulder in between Body: medium flat gold tinsel Wing: Two crimson hackles on the inside, two rich yellow over those with two french blue hackles over those Sides: JC eyes tied long Front: Crimson hackle wrapped first followed by french blue
  10. Another link with even more info on the differences between the two. It's from the owner of Cookshill Fly Tying over in the UK. He skins and cures pretty much all the pelts he sells. His stuff is very high quality. https://www.flyfishing-and-flytying.co.uk/articles/view/quality_control_what_determines_quality_in_natural_fly-tying_materials/
  11. They have it broken down at Flyshacks website explaining what's included and what each piece is best for. The picture of it looks just like Norm / flytire described and posted. Regards, Mark
  12. In Frederic Halford's 1886 book Floating Flies and How to Dress Them, it's the shiny side forward. I guess that was a little bit before genetic hackle was available 😉
  13. I always thought they were Fallfish. We just call them chubs up here too. The tail looks more forked since it's hanging vertically. Here are a couple of shots of when they get a little larger.
  14. Take a look at some of Preston Jennings streamer patterns here . They will give you some ideas to at least get started with some of the colors that you may have. Regards, Mark
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