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Fly Tying

Philly

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About Philly

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  • Favorite Species
    Smallmouth Bass
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  • Location
    Philadelphia, PA SE PA

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  1. Philly

    Fish Pictures

    I was going through some old pictures(taken 15 years ago). I caught this trout out of a private lake my salt water fly fishing club had been invited to fish in west central PA. Cut Throat?
  2. I'm recovering from left knee surgery at my sister's. So I don't have access to my hooks. This is about the closest I have to the hook in you picture. I believe it's a Partridge hook, though it could be another brand. I brought them at the local TFO shop. I believe it's a size 6.
  3. Looks like a Little Black Caddis. We get around here earlier in the season, body's a dark grey, wings are black. The soft hackle should work, just down size it to 16 or 18. Also try fishing it on the swing, since they make their way to the shore to hatch. One thing I learned, particularly with the local Little Black Caddis, because an insect is a size 16, doesn't mean you want to tie it on a size 16 hook. I was trying to tie a dry version and used a size 16 hook. It turned out to be a lot bigger than actual insect. Finally ended up using a size 20 TMC 2488 to tie it.
  4. Thought I had more pictures of my bluegill patterns.. Here's two of them. First one is tied with Senyo laser dub. The second one a spinner bait skirt*(Calcasieu Pig Boat)
  5. As long as it's not a size 32 Royal Wulff, any fly I tie is my favorite. I've got a few ideas, hopefully in a couple of weeks when my new knee has loosened up enough for me to sit comfortably at my tying desk. The spotted lantern fly pattern, the flossing brush caddis, and a few more. I do like tying foam patterns.
  6. I don't tie them that often. Last time I did I used snowshoe rabbit since I didn't have any calf tail.
  7. dairydave, I'm a dry fly snob also. Much rather fish top water flies than drift nymphs or strip streamers. Generally, I don't punch my popper bodies from foam sheets or blocks. I either use craft foam sheets or just buy the various types of soft foam popper bodies though I don't particularly care for the double barreled poppers. Here's some of the poppers I make out of foam sheets. First up is the "fun foam" popper. It's the first popper pattern I learned to tie. It's a foam circle punched out of a sheet of foam. I'll coat it with some UV resin to stiffen it a bit. It does push a lot of water. I've seen it tied down to size 10, but it's easier to tie on size 8 hooks on up. Side and front view This is a modification of a popper I learned from Harry Steeves. I've never seen the original in any of his books on tying with foam, so I don't know the name, if he ever gave it one. This one uses a heart shaped piece of foam for the popper head. I brought punches for them at a craft store, or you can wait till Valentines Day and you can pick up bags of them. Again a side and front view This one I learned in a class in the spring of 2019. Of course, I've forgotten the guy's name and what he called it. It's sort of a variation on a crease fly, another popper made out from craft foam sheets. Side view and front view
  8. Philly

    Tube Flies

    I recovered some pictures of top water tube flies I tied up, mainly for bass.
  9. I have a similar set, though I mostly use them with 2 mm. I do use a file to sharpen them every so often.. If you can fit them in a drill, you should be able to "punch" through 1 inch foam.
  10. I've never specifically fish for crappie. Probably because I prefer fishing top water. I've caught some while targeting other pan fish. These are the two flies I caught them on. The first I call an estaz bug. Fairly, simple tie. It was intended to mimic the small Mr. Twister grubs I used to fish for crappie before moved on to fly fishing. It should work tied on a jig hook. Second one is a large soft hackle tied on a size 6 hook. These were tied for a Casting For Recovery retreat. That's why the colors are pink and purple. I'll probably tie up some over the winter in white and chartreuse. Again, you could tie it on a jig hook.
  11. After complaining about them I found three large double barrel popper bodies in with the rest of my foam bodies. Main complaint about them is the hole for the hook doesn't go all the way through the body. It's sort of hit and miss whether the exit hole in the front is centered. It's harder to blend the colors I like to use. Something to do with the texture of the skin. I also found around a dozen smaller ones, pan fish size. As my friend says "It's something to do."
  12. Some poppers tied on what I consider standard foam popper bodies. This type seems to be falling out of favor, being replaced by the double barrel popper bodies. They seem to have disappeared from the fly catalogs I get in the mail.
  13. The first time I ever saw anyone use a fly rod was when I was in college in NW Tennessee, of all places, in the mid-70's. I was meeting a friend, Roger Peacock, to fish one of our English professors farm pond. He showed up with this funny looking rod and reel with this funky lure made out of deer hair attached to what looked like really thin plastic clothes line. He proceeded to go through various contortions to get the lure to land on the water so the bass could see it. It wasn't a great day for either of us. I caught the only fish, a decent 3 or 4 lb bass which went home for dinner, of the day on a Jitterbug. I guess it must of stuck somewhere in the back of my smoke befuddled mind. About 15 years later, I'd reached the limits of what I could do with spinning rod. I was fishing an ultralight spinning rig, that was the equivalent to a 0 or 1 wgt fly rod. I was building my own rods, so I built myself a fly rod. It took a couple of tries but finally made one that worked for me. Looked up local fly shops and found one in Media, PA not far from my sister's house. Stopped by there, Barry, the owner, was really helpful. Sold me my first reel, changed it so I could use my left hand to reel in the line, put on the backing, sold me a some flies and I was on my way down the slippery slope. It was a group effort. Barry and his store manager, Mary Kuss, the old guys at the Main Line Fly Tyers club, a guy name Bill Horowith, who ran a bed and breakfast near Starrucca, PA and guided on the Upper Delaware. He introduced me to snowshoe rabbit as a tying material and told me "If you keep bringing that damn spinning rod with you when you go out with me, you'll never learn how to fly fish," Many influences, the most influential, the people I met on the [email protected] list over the years. I had a chance to fish with, tie flies, share meals and drink with many of them at 4 or 5 day gatherings, claves as they were called, around the Northeast. There were world class tyers on the list who were willing to share their patterns and show you how to tie then when you had a chance to meet them either at the claves or, for me, the NJ Fly Fishing and Fly tying shows. Folks who had more fly fishing knowledge in their little fingers back then than I have in my head after 25 years of sliding down the slope, and shared it willing. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.
  14. I've been tying a lot the last couple weeks. These are "why did I buy this material" flies. Not sure whether the foam bodies are suppose to be poppers or divers. Don't like flat bottom poppers so turned them into divers. Plan to fish them off of an intermediate or sinking line. Finally tied a purple fly.
  15. The buggers are all over my neighborhood this year. Didn't see them in this part of the city last year. I've gotten 5 or 6 of them that stayed still long enough for me to crush them with my cane. I really want to stun one so I can use it as a model for a fly. Figure as numerous as they are some of them are going to end up in the creeks, particularly the Wissahickon and I imagine fish will eat them. They are a neat looking bug but much better dead.
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