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Fly Tying

utyer

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About utyer

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 07/20/1944

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  • Favorite Species
    Salmonids
  • Security
    2007

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  • Location
    Orlando, Florida since November 2012

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  1. utyer

    My 61 Birthday

    Just now saw this, sorry to hear this Mark. Hope you are back on your feet soon.
  2. Current retail for Mustad 36890 is about 14.00 for a 50 pack.
  3. Here are two images of Rooster Saddles I have from Whiting Farms The first shows a Grizzly (barred black and white,) on top, and a Dun (smokey gray) on the bottom. The second shows the same Grizzly saddle on top and a Dark brown saddle on the bottom. These are 3 of the top colors used by a lot of tiers. For me they are the top 3. The difference between a Neck Cape and a Saddle Patch is in the length of usable hackle, and the range of sizes on either the Cape or Patch. Neck Capes will have shorter usable hackle, but a much larger range of sizes. A Saddle will have a much longer set of hackles in a much smaller small range of sizes. Good Whiting Saddles will have a 3 to 4 size range of hackles. The And Grizzly and Dun Saddles pictured are in a 16 to 22 range, They are long enough that I can tie up to 6 flies on the Grizzly and 9 flies on the Dun. As you die more flies on the same Saddle, the barbs will get shorter, so the last few flies would need to be in a smaller size. These 3 Saddles are at least 25 years old, and still have a long way to go. I tie tiny 20 to 22 size midges with both the Grizzly and the Dun colors. I also have a "White" (is actually a very light cream color that is this small which I use for stacked hackles in 16 to 20 sizes. All together I have more than 30 Whiting Saddles and about 20 necks. They are old, and acquired back when I was tying custom orders. I no longer do that so what I have will last as long enough to outlast me.
  4. utyer

    Rainbow Trout?

    I have seen, these in Utah as well. Easy to spot for predators.
  5. utyer

    Norvise

    I use both the Nor-vise and the bobbins. Lets talk via PM.
  6. That is some very nice work working, excellent job Mike
  7. A long while back, Scientific Angler made a very similar reel. Orvis reels usually had their name on the center button. SA reels did not, and they were both made in England.
  8. The Nor-vise auto bobbin is a self retracting vise as well. I have 3 and they work very well for me.
  9. Sleet3t, I corrected my post to reflect that I was not under any sort of power other than me. I was quite surprised to find out a NON powered craft needed to be registered. I had been fishing it for 5 years in at least 3 western states without any registration. Live and learn.
  10. I have had the opportunity to fish in at least 7 states, Canada, and Mexico. I have had a lot of encounters with rangers, wardens and other enforcement personnel. When I first went back to PA, I was paddling my pontoon kick boat and a warden flagged me in to check my "boat registration." I had my out of state license, and my reading of the proclamation said "personal watercraft" did not need a license. The warden told me that personal craft meant belly boats and inflatables towed behind other craft. He did cut me a break and didn't impound my pontoon. I got it registered, with a "fake" serial number from the maker. and no more issues. In Michigan, we were fishing the Pere Marquette, and in getting the rods out, someone knocked down my parking pass. I had a citation in the car when I got back. I went to the office in Baldwin and showed my lifetime parks pass. They said only the issuing officer could cancel the ticket, and he was on patrol. Driving down to our cabin, I spotted an official car and stopped to ask if they had been the ones who ticked my car. My good luck, they were, and they did take back the citation. Most of the time when I do encounter fish and game wardens, it usually to see how I did, and take a survey on my fishing results. Since I don't keep fish often, never a problem.
  11. For over 10 years, all my purchases of hooks have been for MFC (Montana Fly Company,) hooks. I have not had any problems with any of them. Here is a link to their 4 XL freshwater streamer hook which sells for $11.00 per hundred. There seems to be a problem with attaching links so here it is from my source. https://www.dreamdriftflies.com/product_info.php?cPath=147_675_149&products_id=3288 control tap should launch it. or cut and past. ALSO Umpqua has an excellent line of lower priced hooks in the U series. The 4 XL in this hook sells for 11.20 per hundred. AvidMax is a good source which offers loyalty points with any purchase. I am NOT connected to either of these vendors, These are imply the hooks I have been using.
  12. Back in the dark ages when I started, I followed my only resource on tying. The Wise Fisherman's Encyclopedia from 1951. There were simple drawings in black and white on tying the Royal Coachman Wet Fly, & a Black Gnat, Dry fly, that was IT. Other patterns and techniques were of course listed, but little else shown. When I started teaching about 10 years later, I started with the Bivisible, and the Renegade. Now I start with the most BASIC pattern there is, a Thread Midge Larvae. A beginner can learn to tie an effective pattern that will catch a trout or panfish with nothing but a hook and some thread. I always start out with white thread, and have my students color the pattern with markers. The next step is to add a rib. A very fine copper wire salvaged from electrical cords or computer cables. These I add a bead head (glass and tiny,) When a novice is starting out, there is a load of equipment to get, and having people have to spend another $50.00 on materials, is a burden they can live without to get started. One other expense they can life without is the cost of classes. I have never charged for any instruction, and never will.
  13. I live in Orlando, and usually fish the Indian River or Mosquito Lagoons. Unfortunately, they have gotten so dirty there is no site fishing. I switched to walking the dikes around the Indian River Lagoon and catch Small (ok baby,) tarpon, Snook, Redfish, Sea Trout, and Lady fish all over. The water in the retention ponds is cleaner than the lagoons. Surf fishing with a fly rod is also a productive way to fish. For fresh water, follow Mike's advice, there are many lakes and ponds that have bass and pan fish. Not many (but some,) can be accessed from shore or better still a kayak. There is a Shad spawning run on the St Johns River every year. It begins in LATE November, and extends through February into March. The St Johns has some walk in access, but its a 2 mile plus walk in. On the Econlockhatchee ( a tributary to the St Johns, there is easier walk in access. Fly fishing for Shad is good on both rivers south of Lake Harney and Rout 46. PM me and I can provide further details. I grew up across the Sound in central Long Island. Left there in 57 for Utah.
  14. I don't always do flies in carry on, but I have and haven't had any problems.
  15. utyer

    Poor Mikey

    In south Orlando, it never got below 32 last night. Coldest its been since I moved down here. Last time I saw snow was in Idaho last May.
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